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The V-Boats ~ Page 2
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USS V-4 (Argonaut) SS 166 about ready to launch. The yard is still to 'dress ship' for the occasion, meaning draping the signal flags from the top of the periscope to the bow and stern and hoisting the Union Jack and American Flag. If you look you can see those things haven't been done. She was launched on November 10, 1927, probably a few days away, at Portsmouth Naval Ship Yard, Kittery, Maine.

US Navy Photo

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USS V-4 (Argonaut) Bow area. This drawing shows the multi deck interior of the Argonaut. Above the Torpedo Room is an entirely separate pressure hull that contained a Radio Room and a Windless Room. Access to these spaces seems to be through the forward escape trunk. Since the forward radio mast is above the Radio area this may have been just an equipment space.

Aft of the escape trunk is what looks like two curved bulkheads. These are just bulkhead stiffeners. At this point it becomes one pressure hull. This are the forward end of the main pressure hull containing the ships Galley and Crews Messing area plus the main Crews berthing. A deck below, under the Galley, is the Crews Head and Wash Room and the ships Refrigerator and Freezer aft of the head.

Admiral James Fife, Jr., commanding submarine Task Force 42 in Brisbane, Australia, (where Argonaut was stationed), believing that all submarines, even ones specially adapted, such as Argonaut, should conduct war patrols when not actively involved in their speciality and had her ordered out. Argonaut was old, slow, under powered and unwieldy and totally unfit for the rough and tumble that an active war patrol needed. Regardless she was ordered out for such patrol and it became her last.

On January 10, 1943 Argonaut spotted a convoy of five freighters and their destroyer escorts. An Army aircraft was by chance flying overhead and witnessed Argonaut's attack. Argonaut hit at least one of the destroyers with her torpedoes, and they promptly counter attacked. A crew member on board the plane saw Argonaut's bow suddenly break the water at an unusual angle. It is this portion of the sub, seen above, that was seen and attacked by the Japanese destroyers Isokaze and Maikaze. The aircraft was out of ammunition and could offer no help to the submarine. It was apparent that a depth charge had severely damaged the submarine. The destroyers continued circling Argonaut and pumping shells into her bow. She slipped below the waves and was never heard from again. One hundred and two officers and men went down with the submarine.

US Navy Drawings

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USS V-4 (Argonaut) Midship lines drawings. At the right can be seen the Crews berthing area. Just aft of this is the Officers Ward Room and Berthing spaces. Below is seen the forward ships battery. At the aft end of the battery is the forward storage for the submarines forward 6 inch deck gun. One of two ammunition hoists take the shell and powder charge up to the deck to be loaded in the gun.

At the forward end of the conning tower fairwater is a midships deck access and escape trunk. This is leading up from inside the Control Room. To the left of the ladder to this trunk is the actual Radio Room in a heavily insulated space to protect the equipment from stray electro magnetic radiation.

Aft of the Conning Tower barrel is the After Escape Trunk and bridge access trunk leading up from the After Battery and serving the stern regions of the submarine. Up in the bridge structure can be seen the topside helm station in the covered area at the front of the conning tower barrel. The after 6 inch gun is seen on the aft deck. Twin to the one forward.

Below the Control Room is the Pump Room. In this space, besides the pumps for the bilges and trimming, is a small diesel engine attached to an air compressor for replenishing the air banks.

Aft of the Pump Room is the After Battery Bank and aft of that the aft 6 inch shell and powder storage with its own ammunition hoist.

Aft of the Control Room the space is divided by a pressure bulkhead. Aft of these are the Ships Office and Chief Petty Officers berthing and Wash Room and Dining spaces.

In the after Starboard corner is the Manoeuvring Room. In later Fleet Boats this space was moved all the way aft of the Engine Rooms.

A water tight bulkhead divides the submarine at this point and the upper and lower Engine Room is aft or to the left of these space. A deck access hatch with ladders can be seen at the forward end of the engine room.

The print I got this from had this dark smudging and I can not find a way of clearing this up with out much loss of detail.

US Navy Drawings

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USS V-4 (Argonaut) lines drawings of the mine storage and mine laying tubes aft.This space was also a major Crews Berthing area with bunks for 26 crew.

This space is hard to describe. The mines were stored in two massive rotating drums. Almost akin to the cartridge chamber in a six shot pistol. The drums rotated bringing the mines to be loaded into alignment with the two mine laying tubes. As one drum emptied the mines farther forward were moved aft in the empty spaces.

Under the most forward mine drum were the two massive ships electric motors attached to the shafts and propellers.

US Navy Drawings

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USS V-4 (Argonaut) SS 166 on launch day November 10, 1927 at Portsmouth Naval Ship Yard, Kittery, Maine. Her two 40 inch aft mine laying tubes can be seen under her stern just above the rudder. She was designed to carry up to 60 of the MK XI type mines.

US Navy Photo

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USS V-4 (Argonaut) SS 166 slides down the ways, November 10, 1927. When launched she became the largest submarine in the world at 381 feet in length and a 33½ foot beam. She would weight 3128 tonnes on the surface and 4164 tonnes submerged. She remained the largest US built submarine until the the US missile submarine USS George Washington was built at 381.6 feet in length in 1959.

Photo courtesy of Navsource.org and the Boston Herald-Traveler

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USS V-4 (Argonaut) SS 166 slides down the ways, November 10, 1927. When launched she became the largest submarine in the world at 381 feet in length and a 33½ foot beam. She would weight 3128 tonnes on the surface and 4164 tonnes submerged. She remained the largest US built submarine until the the US missile submarine USS George Washington was built at 381.6 feet in length in 1959.

US Navy Photo

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USS V-4 (Argonaut) post launch, November 10, 1927. Tugs are taking her in tow to remove her to the fitting out docks. Portsmouth Naval Ship Yard, Kittery, Maine.

US Navy Photo

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USS V-4 (Argonaut) and the diminutive USS O-2 in dry dock together. The dock is being flooded through ports in the dry dock gates at the rear of the image. The V-4 at that time was the largest submarine in the world at 381 feet long and the O-2 had a length of 172 feet, 209 feet shorter than the V-4!

US Navy Photo

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USS V-4 (Argonaut) about to exit the dry dock. The dock gates are open and the O-2 has left to go back to her mooring. The number 1 torpedo tube outer door can be just above the waterline.
US Navy Photo

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USS V-4 (Argonaut) on Commissioning Day April 2, 1928. The crew is turned out on deck wearing flat hats as uniform of the day. A Navy Band is playing on the back deck and a news reel photographer on the pier is filming the event for showing in the movie theaters later. It would be nice to see that film.

US Navy Photo

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USS V-4 (Argonaut) on Commissioning Day April 2, 1928. This photo is taken just a few moments after the previous one. The man on the stern has completed raising the flag and is saluting it. Another camera man has moved into the frame.

US Navy Photo

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USS V-4 (Argonaut) was built with some new safety features as the results of the sinking of the USS F-4, sunk on March 25; 1915; S-5, sunk September 1, 1920; O-5, sunk October 28, 1923; and S-4, sunk on December 1, 1927 and the extreme difficulty of salvage workers to recover the submarines. Here, Lt jg John A. Hollowell is showing the two External Salvage valves that divers can use to send air to the Forward and After groups of ballast tanks from the subs own high pressure air flasks.

US Navy Photo

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Close-up of the Salvage Air valve handles on the USS V-4. The right hand valve says "FOR'D GROUP" and the valve handle has one hole in it so divers can identify it in the dark or murky waters. The left hand valve says "AIR OPEN SALVAGE" with a direction arrow through OPEN, this valve is for the AFT GROUP and has two holes. Divers can feel these holes and know which valve they are touching. You can see on the inside of the valve handle the words "BALLAST TANKS".

US Navy Photo

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USS V-4 (Argonaut) was built with some new safety features such as these externally mounted salvage valves. Here, Lt jg John A. Hollowell is showing the External Salvage valve for the Officers Quarters Compartment that is located on the fore deck of submarine. Divers can use this to send air to that space using air from the subs own high pressure air flasks or from an external air source. Photo taken June 26, 1928.

US Navy Photo

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Close-up of the USS V-4 (Argonaut) External Salvage valves for the Officers Quarters. Lettering says: "SALVAGE AIR, OFFICERS QUARTERS". Photos taken June 26, 1928.

US Navy Photo

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Extreme close-up of the USS V-4 (Argonaut) External Salvage valves for the Officers Quarters. Lettering says: "SALVAGE AIR, OFFICERS QUARTERS". The finger is pointing to the place an external air hose would be attached. Photos taken June 26, 1928.

US Navy Photo

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USS V-4 (Argonaut) forward 6 inch 53 caliber deck gun. Crewmen posing with the gun for publicity photos. The ammunition hoist for sending the 6" projectile and powder up to the deck can be seen sticking out of the deck to the left. The rest of the crew are trying to stay out of the photographers way while be takes this shot. The barrel plug can been seen in the barrel muzzle and the brace for supporting the end of the barrel is laying flat on the deck. Various deck hatches can be seen to give access to places and things in the superstructure.

US Navy Photo

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USS V-4 (Argonaut) forward 6 inch 53 caliber deck gun. Crewmen posing with the gun for publicity photos. The 'luggage' seen against the conning tower are probably equipment cases for the photographers and film crews along for the ride. The rest of the crew are trying to stay out of the photographers way while be takes this shot. The barrel plug can been seen in the barrel muzzle and the brace for supporting the end of the barrel is laying flat on the deck.

US Navy Photo

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USS V-4 (Argonaut) off Provencetown, Mass. making her dive for her endurance trials on June 21, 1928.
US Navy Photo

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USS V-4 (Argonaut) off Provencetown, Mass. making her dive for her endurance trials on June 21, 1928.
US Navy Photo

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USS V-4 (Argonaut) off Provencetown, Mass. making a surface after endurance trials June 21, 1928. She set a diving record for a US submarine at that time she submerged to a depth of 318 feet. The deepest a US sub had ever gone to date.

US Navy Photo

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USS V-4 (Argonaut) off Provencetown, Mass. making a surface after endurance trials June 21, 1928. She set a diving record for a US submarine at that time she submerged to a depth of 318 feet. The deepest a US sub had ever gone to date.

US Navy Photo

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USS V-4 (Argonaut) seen around the time of her trial runs off Provencetown, circa June 21, 1928, based on the paint job as seen in this photo and the preceeding photos. She set a diving record for a US submarine at that time she submerged to a depth of 318 feet during her trials. This was the deepest a US sub had ever gone to date.

US Navy Photo

USS Argonaut SS 166
USS V-4 (Argonaut) SS 166 probably taken while with Submarine Division 12 based at Newport, R.I.

USS Argonaut SS 166
USS V-4 (Argonaut) SS 166 probably taken while with Submarine Division 12 based at Newport, R.I.

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The USS V-4 (Argonaut) seen here, about seven months after her commissioning, stationed with Submarine Squadron 12 on November 26, 1928 at Newport, RI. A large crane has a cable lowered into the superstructure and possibly, through a "soft patch", in to the machinery spaces of the submarine. The submarine has mounted its own Kingpost and boom to help with the work.

Just to the left of the door in the side of the fairwater is the after ammunition hoist. The shells for the guns were brought up from below this way. The shell and powder were in separate parts due to the weight involved with each part being too much for easy handling.

Original News Photo in the Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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The USS V-4 (Argonaut) seen here stationed with Submarine Squadron 12 on November 26, 1928 at Newport, RI. A large crane has a cable lowered into the superstructure and possibly, through a "soft patch", in to the machinery spaces of the submarine. The submarine has mounted its own Kingpost and boom to help with the work.

Just to the left of the door in the side of the fairwater is the after ammunition hoist. The shells for the guns were brought up from below this way. The shell and powder were in separate parts due to the weight involved with each part being too much for easy handling.

Original News Photo in the Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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The USS V-4 (Argonaut) stern is seen in this close-up while she was stationed with Submarine Squadron 12 on November 26, 1928 at Newport, RI. Seen is the stern light mounted on the aft rail. The mooring lines are run through the after towing fairlead and lead to a set of bitts mounted on the aft deck.

Original News Photo in the Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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The USS V-4 (Argonaut) stern section with screw guards is seen in this close-up while she was stationed with Submarine Squadron 12 on November 26, 1928 at Newport, RI. The screw guards were to protect the the propellers from tangling with cables and chains that moored submerged mines. These were original requirements demanded by the British for US WW I submarines operating in British waters. They had learned the hard way the reality of submarine warfare at sea. The Inclosed metal chariot bridge for protecting the crew was also part of that learning process. All these things were kept in the requirements for US submarines leading up and into WW II.

Original News Photo in the Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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The USS V-4 (Argonaut) proceeds up the East River while on her way to San Diego, Ca. New York City waterfront make a dramatic backdrop for this photo passing under the Brooklyn Bridge on her way to the Brooklyn Navy Yards. She left Newport, RI on Feb, 26 1929 and arrived in San Diego on March 23, 1929. She was assigned to Division 20, Submarine Divisions, Battle Fleet, at San Diego.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph

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Close-up of the above. The USS V-4 (Argonaut) proceeds up the East River while on her way to San Diego, Ca. She is passing under the Brooklyn Bridge on her way to the Brooklyn Navy Yards. She left Newport, RI on Feb, 26 1929 and arrived in San Diego on March 23, 1929. She was assigned to Division 20, Submarine Divisions, Battle Fleet, at San Diego.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph

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The USS V-4 (Argonaut) passing through the Panama Canal on her way to San Diego, Ca. No date but the time frame must be circa mid March 1929. The shapes on the shore are range markers. When the various shapes lined up you knew you were on course.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph

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The USS V-4 underway at sea on a sunny day, maybe off Hawaii. Many crew are on deck perhaps to get some fresh air. circa 1930.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph

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The USS V-4, the USS S-44 and an unidentified S-boat moored for an open house, Navy Day, San Diego Harbor, October 1929. Almost unseen in the background is the United States first Aircraft Carrier, the USS Langley, steaming past from right to left. The smoke from her stacks can be seen trailing astern.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph

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An other view head on of the above photo showing the USS V-4 (Argonaut) and the USS S-44, far right and an unidentified S-boat moored in the middle, for a Navy Day open house in San Diego Harbor, October 1929.

Seen in the lower left corner of the photo is one of the V-4's two launches. These were stored under the deck on the bow just aft of the forward torpedo room escape trunk. One was a rowing boat and the other a motorized launch. This is the motor launch.

Photo In The Private Collection Of Ric Hedman

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Photo taken from the aft deck of the USS Argonaut (ex-V-4) moored to the docks at the Immigration Station in Honolulu Harbor with the USS S-47, S-32 and S-28 moored out board her. In the background is seen the Aloha Tower that greeted the many visitors that came by steamship to the islands. It may be a holiday like the 4th of July or Navy Day since the vessels are open to the public with many visitors aboard. circa 1932

Official U.S. Navy Photograph

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This view appears to be taken from the the dock that the USS Argonaut (ex-V-4) is moored to and is assumed to be the Quarantine Dock at the Immigration Station in Honolulu Harbor. As in the photo above, there are three "S" type submarines moored outside her and are presumed to be the same USS S-47, S-32 and S-28.

There are enough similarities, down to the American flag flying from the radio masthead of the S-47 and signal flags, (though the inboard sub has either not raised them or maybe has lowered its flags), to make one think the two photos were taken at the same time. It may be a holiday like the 4th of July or maybe Navy Day. circa 1932

Official U.S. Navy Photograph

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The USS Argonaut (ex-V-4) passing in through the Pearl Harbor channel into the harbor itself in this colorized photo from circa post February 19, 1931. Instead of wearing her V-4 name on her conning tower she has now been named 'Argonaut' and wearing the A-1 class designator there.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph

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The USS V-4 (Argonaut) now wearing the A-1 designation. The time frame is circa 1932. All nine submarines of the "V Class" were given "type designators". The three early boats, Bass, Barracuda and Bonita were give "B" designators. Argonaut was given A-1. Narwhal and Nautilus were Given "N designators". Dolphin was the "D-1" and the last two, Cashalot and Cuttlefish were C-1 and C-2. By the time the 1930's had ended these were gone in favor of hull numbers.

The type written caption at the top is in error for the time frame of WW II as all reference to a submarines identification had been removed due to the war. The radio towers in the background seem to indicate this might be Pearl Harbor. On the deck just below the oval opening into the fairwater is a deck hatch that is open as well as the Ammunition Hoist to bring the 6"/53 caliber projectiles and powder cartridges on deck for the after deck gun, (seen on the right side of photo). The forward gun can be seen to the left in the photo. A man is on deck near the gun for scale. There is a like Ammunition Hoist on the other side of the fairwater near that gun as well.

Original Photo in the Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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Nautilus, Argonaut and Narwhal all moored together in the mid 1930's. They still show their class status by their N-2, A-1 and N-1 designator on the conning towers. They appear to be moored to the Navy docks in Honolulu Harbor, Pier 5 to the left and pier 5A to the right.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph

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A series of 12 photos of the USS Argonaut (SS 166) ex-V-4 playing a WW I German U-Boat, the U-172 in the 1931 movie "Seas Beneath". Below is the movie synopsis. The photos explain them selves. The Seas Beneath was largely filmed on location in and around Catalina Island.

Movie Synopsis from The Seas Beneath

In August 1918, as the U.S. Mystery Ship No. 2 sails from Yorktown harbor, the commander, Lieutenant Robert Kingsley, U.S.N., tells his crew, the nature of their secret mission: they are to provoke a German U-boat, commandeered by Baron Ernst Von Steuben, who has built up a reputation as an ace destroyer of ships near Gibraltar, to fire on them so that the U-boat will be drawn into firing range of the submarine the Mystery Ship has in tow. The crew composed of an untested university naval reserve unit and an experienced, crack gun team, are encouraged to practice a "panic drill," during which they will act like a merchant crew that his been shelled, running around screaming in fright and abandoning ship, to fool the enemy. When one of the gun crew acts out a tale of past heroism for the younger reservists, he falls into the ocean, and as he flails about, Ensign Dick Cabot, scion of an upper-class family, rescues him. Cabot receives the congratulations of the older men, who previously were sceptical of the reservists' abilities. They reach a port in the Canary Islands that Bob has learned is used for refueling U-boats. Although Bob issues orders prohibiting the drinking of hard liquor and the fraternization with women, the sailors immediately cavort with enticing Spanish women and accompany them to a bar. Bob is attracted to a beautiful blonde woman, who, unknown to him, is Anna Marie Von Steuben, the sister of the feared U-boat ace. After Anna Marie arranges to accompany German officers, including her sweetheart, Franz Schiller, on a trawler to visit her brother in his U-boat, Lolita, a Spanish singer and dancer, receives orders from Franz to get information about the Americans. As she performs in a cafe, Lolita flirts with Cabot, and after she leaves, Cabot follows to return her shawl. She entices the shy man to her room and gives him drugged wine. When he passes out, a German officer searches him and finds papers to confirm that he is an American officer. While he is unconscious, Lolita, uneasy about what she has done, kisses him. After Bob and Anna Marie walk together by the sea, Bob and the German officers recognize each other as enemy officers. Defiantly, they toast to their next meeting. The Americans return to their ship and set out despite failed efforts to locate Cabot. He revives in time to see them leave, and after he spies Lolita accepting money from the Germans for her services, he sneaks on their trawler as it heads to the U-boat. While Anna Marie greets her brother Ernst on the U-boat, Cabot sets fire to the trawler and hacks at a pump. When a German shoots and kills him, Franz reprimands the man. The officers then salute Cabot during his burial at sea. After the U-boat leaves, the leak on the trawler is discovered, and Anna Marie is saved in a lifeboat. Sometime later, the Americans find Cabot's body. They then locate the lifeboat, and Bob is forced to detain Anna Marie for questioning in relation to Cabot's death. She confesses that she is Von Steuben's sister and taunts the Americans. When the U-boat shells the Mystery Ship, the men begin their "panic party," and Anna Marie signals the U-boat to stay away. Bob orders a man to shoot her if she makes another move. When the U-boat refuses to come closer, Bob orders his sub to be cut free to fight the U-boat itself. As the U-boat shells the Mystery Ship again and the hold explodes in a fire, Bob and others rescue two men below. The U-boat then comes into range, and the Americans sink it. As German prisoners, including Franz and Von Steuben, are picked up to be sent to a detention camp, Bob tells Anna Marie that he's lost the only thing he ever cared about. Anna Marie assures him he will never lose that, but refuses when he suggests that they get married immediately. She explains that her country and people are in trouble and that she wouldn't be worth wanting if she abandoned them. She will not accept film taken of the two of them that Bob tries to give her, and says it will be a reason for her to come back. She then walks off with her arm around her brother as Bob watches.

Photo Provided by Robert Morgan.

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Photos Provided by Wendy Gully of the Submarine Force Library from the personal collection of LCDR William Quigley, USN, Commanding Officer of ARGONAUT (V-4) at the time of the filming.

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Photos Provided by Wendy Gully of the Submarine Force Library from the personal collection of LCDR William Quigley, USN, Commanding Officer of ARGONAUT (V-4) at the time of the filming.

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Photos Provided by Wendy Gully of the Submarine Force Library from the personal collection of LCDR William Quigley, USN, Commanding Officer of ARGONAUT (V-4) at the time of the filming.

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Photos Provided by Wendy Gully of the Submarine Force Library from the personal collection of LCDR William Quigley, USN, Commanding Officer of ARGONAUT (V-4) at the time of the filming.

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Photos Provided by Wendy Gully of the Submarine Force Library from the personal collection of LCDR William Quigley, USN, Commanding Officer of ARGONAUT (V-4) at the time of the filming.

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Photos Provided by Wendy Gully of the Submarine Force Library from the personal collection of LCDR William Quigley, USN, Commanding Officer of ARGONAUT (V-4) at the time of the filming.

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Photos Provided by Wendy Gully of the Submarine Force Library from the personal collection of LCDR William Quigley, USN, Commanding Officer of ARGONAUT (V-4) at the time of the filming.

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Photos Provided by Wendy Gully of the Submarine Force Library from the personal collection of LCDR William Quigley, USN, Commanding Officer of ARGONAUT (V-4) at the time of the filming.

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Photos Provided by Wendy Gully of the Submarine Force Library from the personal collection of LCDR William Quigley, USN, Commanding Officer of ARGONAUT (V-4) at the time of the filming.

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Photos Provided by Wendy Gully of the Submarine Force Library from the personal collection of LCDR William Quigley, USN, Commanding Officer of ARGONAUT (V-4) at the time of the filming.

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Photos Provided by Wendy Gully of the Submarine Force Library from the personal collection of LCDR William Quigley, USN, Commanding Officer of ARGONAUT (V-4) at the time of the filming.

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Nautilus and Argonaut moored in the foreground of this Life Magazine photo. There is an unidentified "S" class submarine moored outboard the Argonaut to the right. To the far left you can just make out the "80" of the USS Pollack (SS-180). In the far background you can see the Escape Training Tower where submariners trained on how to make an underwater escape from a sunk submarine. circa 1940

Photo from LIFE Magazine via Dave Johnston DCC SS/SW

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The USS Argonaut approaching the dock at Sub Base Pearl Harbor after she and Nautilus returned from the Makin Island raid with "Carlson's Raiders", 221 Marines from the 2nd Raider Battalion.

Between the end of the dock and the bow of Argonaut you can see the bow of the Nautilus. A Marine honor guard is on the pier along with a Navy Band and the Commander-in-Chief in the Pacific, Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, USN.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

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HEROES RETURN --Marine raiders line the deck of the U.S. Submarine from which they conducted their surprise raid on Makin Island as the ship pulls into Pearl Harbor. Submarine officers who took part in the successful attack look down from the conning tower as they come into the harbor to receive the "well done" accolade from their Commander-in-chief in the Pacific, Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, USN.

USMC 2nd Raider Battalion, is shown standing on the deck of the USS Argonaut SS 166 returning from their mission to the Gilbert Islands. On August 17-18, 1942, a force of 221 Marines from the 2nd Raider Battalion, named "Carlson's Raiders" for its commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Evans F. Carlson, landed from two submarines on Butaritari Island, Makin Atoll. The raid inflicted heavy damage and forced the Japanese to divert troops from reinforcing Guadalcanal.

Argonaut was sunk with all hands on January 10,1943. An Army aircraft witnessed her final battle with 3 destroyers guarding a convoy Argonaut was attacking. Saw her bow break water after a severe depth charge attack and receive unrelenting gun fire until she sank with all 105 men and officers.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

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The USS Argonaut (Right) and USS Nautilus, (Left) moored at Sub Base Pearl Harbor after they returned from the Makin Island raid with "Carlson's Raiders".

Photo thourgh the courtesy of Navsource.org

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A Marine Raider, injured during the Makin operation, is lifted through a hatch on USS Argonaut to be taken ashore at Pearl Harbor, 26 August 1942. Though the crew are being as careful as they can the man is in obvious pain from his injuries. Submarine hatches are not made for easy removal of the injured.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

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USS Argonaut (SS-166) Crewmen reading their mail under the forward deck gun, after returning to Pearl Harbor from the Makin Island Raid, 26 August 1942. The gun is one of two 6"/53 caliber carried on Argonaut.

The Steward/Mess Attendant shown in this photo is Willie D. Thomas, OS2/C. He seems to have received a letter from home with a photo in it. Maybe of a wife or child. He appears to be talking with shipmate and fellow steward, Marcelino Taclob "Berg" Bergado, MA/1c. They were among those aboard the Argonaut when she was sunk on January 10, 1943.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

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USS Argonaut loading a torpedo and fitting out before what may be her final patrol and may be one of her last photos. The photo is definably after the Makin Island raid since the 20MM gun mounted in front of her conning tower is absent from those photos. There is a "Bravo" flag lashed to the top of the periscope. That is done when loading fuel or weapons and the smoking lamp is out aboard the sub and the dock areas. The crane on the dock is holding the torpedo in place while the crew rig the tackle for lowering it into the torpedo room. The 6"/53 caliber deck gun is trained to port to give the men room to work.

US Navy Photo

Bravo flag
Bravo Flag means, "I am taking in, discharging, or carrying dangerous cargo."



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