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The T-Boats

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USS AA-1 portrait taken circa late 1918. Location unknown. Her two trainable torpedo tubes located in the superstructure forward and aft of the conning tower are visible as darker rectangles on the hull. These were later removed. The space forward was taken up with the mounting of sponsons to enlarge the deck area for the placement of a 3'/50 caliber deck gun.

AA-1 (ex-SCHLEY) (Submarine No. 52) was laid down on 21 June 1916 at the Fore River Shipbuilding Co. yard in Quincy, Mass., by the Electric Boat Co. of New York; renamed AA-1 on 23 August 1917 to free the name Schley for Destroyer No. 103; launched on 25 July 1918; sponsored by Mrs. Lilian Hovey-King; and commissioned on 30 January 1920 at Boston, Mass.; Lt. Comdr. James Parker, Jr., in command.

AA-1 was one of three boats designed and constructed under a project charged with developing fleet submarines; that is, submarines possessing the sea keeping qualities and endurance capability required for long-range operations, as scouts for the surface fleet. On 17 July 1920, while the submarine was being fitted-out, the Navy adopted its modern system of alpha-numeric hull numbers, and the fleet submarine was designated SF-1. On 20 September, she was renamed T-1. Thus, by the time she began active service that fall, she was known as T-1 (SF-1).

From the Private collection of Ric Hedman.


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USS Schley (AA-1) lines drawings, Main Sheet showing the Contract Plan dated July 23, 1915. The Schley was to be the first US constructed "Fleet Submarine" meaning she was to have surface speeds capable of keeping up with the main aspects of the US Navy Fleets and act as an advance scout. Previous submarine classes were built for shore and harbor defense.

The plans are signed by Rear Admiral, Robert Stanislaus Griffin, Chief of the Bureau of Steam Engineering, USN and Rear Admiral David Watson Taylor who was the Chief Constructor of the Navy and Chief of the Bureau of Construction and Repair. Taylor is best known as the man who constructed the first experimental towing tank ever built in the United States. The David Taylor Model Basin is named in his honor. Secretary of the Navy, Josephus Daniels also signed off on the drawings for this radical new design.

From a Set of Prints In The Private Collection of Ric Hedman.


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USS Schley (AA-1) Bow profile showing the arrangement of various parts of the pressure hull and superstructure as well as the planned waterline.

From a Set of Prints In The Private Collection of Ric Hedman.


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USS Schley (AA-1) Overhead plans drawing of the bow section showing the arrangement of the torpedo room and officers wardroom. The object shown in the center of the torpedo room is actually the capstan motor and gearbox seen in the overhead in the drawing above just forward of the torpedo loading hatch.

The circles shown in the wardroom area are below decks and the forward group of circles are actually air flasks. In the center isa main seawater pump under the deck. The after group aere spare torpedo warheads. Also, under the deck and under bunks and settee in the same area, port and starboard. are four spare torpedos minus warheads giving the submarine a total of twelve torpedoes for offense or defense.

The officers head can be seen at the top edge or port side aft of the wardroom. All the way to the left side of the drawing is the forward crews berthing area. The pressure hull is lined on the outside by air flasks.

From a Set of Prints In The Private Collection of Ric Hedman.


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USS Schley (AA-1) Profile drawing showing the after section of the torpedo room and Officers country and the forward part of the forward crews berthing. The second drawing shows the full crews berthing and battery compartments.

The arrangement for torpedo storage is shown under the deck in the wardroom area and the air flasks and sea water pump and warheads. Note, also, the small boat storage under the superstructure deck aft of the torpedo loading hatch. There is a deck access hatch located in the double water tight door box between compartments.

The Schley was designed to have two double rotating torpedo launchers, fore and aft, in the superstructure. the turning motor and manual gear are located in the overhead in the after crews berthing. One of the two 3"/23 caliber retracting deck guns like the one shown here above the crews quarters. The forward and after batteries are located below the deck in the crews quarters.

From a Set of Prints In The Private Collection of Ric Hedman.


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USS Schley (AA-1) plan drawing show the central section of the submarine including the aft crews berthing with bunk arrangement, ships galley and scullery where all the food was prepared and dishes were washed, the control room and the forward machine space in the engine room containing pumps and air compressors. The plans also seem to show two berths in the control room, possibly for the captain and executive officer if needed.

Tables for the crews eating were set up in the aft end of the aft crews berthing aft the bunks were raised to give room for them.

From a Set of Prints In The Private Collection of Ric Hedman.


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USS Schley (AA-1) drawing showing in profile the aft crews berthing, control along with periscope arrangements and hatches to the superstructure and bridge and ventilation plans. Both the fore and aft external torpedo "batteries" are shown. The control rods for operating the Kingston valves for letting water into the box keel for flooding the ballast tanks are shown under the control room. Under the galley is a food storage space. No indication if it is refrigerated or not.

From a Set of Prints In The Private Collection of Ric Hedman.


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USS Schley (AA-1) close-up of the line drawing of control room and bridge area. What looks to be a steel chariot bridge fairing is actually a pipe frame and canvas is shown lashed to it. The bridge steering pedestal is shown.

Between the periscopes there seems to be a ventilation tube with a manually operated top that can seal it off when diving. Sort of a crude version of a snorkel for use on the surface. There are two control room hatches. One leads to the bridge access trunk and the other, aft of the periscopes, leads to the aft deck of the fairwater.

From a Set of Prints In The Private Collection of Ric Hedman.


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USS Schley (AA-1) Line drawing of the aft control room and the engine room. Interestingly, shown in this drawing more clearly, is the door in the starboard side of the fairwater and inside the fairwater is a head for use while on the surface. It is marked #67 on the drawing just aft of the door.

The after external torpedo tube training gear is shown in the overhead just forward of the forward engines. Exhaust piping and muffles are seen to the left in the overhead and superstructure. The rectangles in the overhead are gravity feed fuel tanks. Fuel was pumped up to them through a series of strainers to remove particulat matter. The water then settled out in these tanks and the clear fuel was drawn off from the top of the tanks, the water settling to the bottom to be drained off later.

The tandem mounted and joined NELSECO diesels are seen in the center and on the left. This system proved to be the major flaw in the design as the engines could not be perfectly synchronized and they would destroy themselves over time.

From a Set of Prints In The Private Collection of Ric Hedman.


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USS Schley (AA-1). Close-up of the line drawing in the fairwater showing the surface use head or toilet. In this drawing they have even included a flushing water tank above it and the flushing water line to the head itself.

From a Set of Prints In The Private Collection of Ric Hedman.


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USS Schley (AA-1) line drawing of the engine room showing the machinery space at the front of the engine room containing the high pressure air compressors for filling the air flasks and the sea water pumps for pumping bilges and trimming water about the boat. Air flasks for the air start of the NELSECO diesels are seem laying on their sides outboard the diesels.

From a Set of Prints In The Private Collection of Ric Hedman.


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USS Schley (AA-1) Line drawing of the after portion of the engine room and showing forward part of the motor room. The head for use of the crew while sunmerged can be seem in the aft starboard corner of teh space.

From a Set of Prints In The Private Collection of Ric Hedman.


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USS Schley (AA-1) line drawing of the after portion of the engine room and showing forward part of the motor room. The motor room it self contained a small auxiliary diesel for charging batteries for when the main diesels weren't available. The aft deck gun can be seen as well as want looks to be a rubber raft carried below the deck external to the pressure hull. The aft deck access hatch can be seen at the extreme left.

From a Set of Prints In The Private Collection of Ric Hedman.


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USS Schley (AA-1) More Lines drawing of the motor room. Just forward of the engine room motor room bulkhead in line with the toilet are shaft clutches that engage/dis-engage the main engines from the motors. Likewise aft of the motors are clutches that engage/dis-engage the motors from the shafts. Aft of these clutches are shaft driven air compressors, (seen on either side of the diesel), and another series of clutches to engage/dis-engage these from the shafts. The later innovation of removing the physical link between the diesels and motors removed all this complexity and damage incurred by mis-alignment of parts.

From a Set of Prints In The Private Collection of Ric Hedman.


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USS Schley (AA-1) Profile drawing of the stern showing the props and rudder and the deck access. There are also several ballast tank valves but it is hard to see in what manner these are used.

From a Set of Prints In The Private Collection of Ric Hedman.


USS AA-1 SS 52

USS AA-1 under construction at the Fore River Shipyard in Quincey, Mass. The photo is dated April 16, 1918. The sub is surrounded by scaffolding so little of the hull is seen but the four under deck mounted trainable torpedo tubes can be seen in front and behind the bridge fairwater. The tubes could be rotated to starboard or port and stopped at any angle. Torpedoes of the time where point and shoot and could not be set to run on a gyro angle as later torpedoes could. This was to allow a sub to fire at a target with out having to spend excess time trying to maneuver and maybe have the target sail out of range. At the bow the covers have not been installed over the bow planes rigging and rotating gears.

From the Private collection of Ric Hedman.

USS T-1 SS 52

USS AA-1 (T-1) SS 52 (ex-Schley, ex- AA-1). Photo taken Sept.8, 1919 off Provincetown, Mass. You can see that during her speed trials she had the pre-war pipe and canvas bridge shelter system rigged for this surface run. In the second photo down you will see that the metal chariot bridge structure, adopted by US submarines during World War I, has been installed. This was copied from the British and Germans who had learned the necessity of diving quickly and installed on our overseas submarines in Europe and the Azores.


USS AA-1 SS 52
USS T-1 SS 52 (ex-Schley, ex- AA-1)

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A photo of the USS AA-1 in Charleston Harbor in April of 1920. She is moored along side the Minesweeper USS Sanderling AM-37 who had returned from mine sweeping operations with other ships, in British and American waters removing in total 70,000 mines.

The AA-1 appears to have mattresses and bedding being aired in the life lines. The photo looks to have been taken from a barge moored to the dock. The Photo taker was Seaman George Peterson, a cook striker, from the USS O-15.

Photo From a The Private Collection of George Peterson.


USS T-1 SS 52

USS T-1 SS 52 (ex-Schley, ex- AA-1)in dry dock. Time frame is sometime between January 1920 and September 1920 when she was renamed "T-1". You can see that she still retains her trainable torpedo tubes in the superstructure but had the metal chariot bridge installed. Location is most likely the Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina.

Photo provided by Rick Larson MMCM(SS) (ret.)


USS T-1 SS 52
USS T-1 SS 52 (ex-Schley, ex- AA-1)
Photo provided by Rick Larson MMCM(SS) (ret.)

USS AA-1 SS 52
USS AA-1 SS 52 (ex-Schley) under construction.
Photo provided by Rick Larson MMCM(SS) (ret.)

USS AA-1 SS 52
USS AA-1 SS 52 (ex-Schley) under construction.
Photo provided by Rick Larson MMCM(SS) (ret.)

USS AA-1 SS 52
USS AA-1 SS 52 (ex-Schley) under construction.
Photo provided by Rick Larson MMCM(SS) (ret.)

USS AA-1 SS 52
USS AA-1 SS 52 (ex-Schley) under construction.
Photo provided by Rick Larson MMCM(SS) (ret.)

USS AA-1 SS 52
USS AA-1 SS 52 (ex-Schley) post launch.
Photo provided by Rick Larson MMCM(SS) (ret.)

USS T-1 alongside the USS Fulton
USS T-1 alongside the USS Fulton
Photo provided by Rick Larson MMCM(SS) (ret.)

USS T-1 alongside the USS Fulton gun detail
USS T-1 alongside the USS Fulton, gun and crew detail.
Photo provided by Rick Larson MMCM(SS) (ret.)

USS T-1
USS T-1


USS T-2 launching
This photo is believed to be the launch photo of the
USS T-2 (AA-2), September 6, 1919.
This has been done by comparison with the photo below.
This could also be the T-3. I have no T-3 photos to compare with.
US Navy Photo

USS T-2 (AA-2) SS60
USS T-2 (AA-2) SS60
Many thanks to Charles R. Hinman, Education & Outreach, USS Bowfin Submarine Museum & Park and the Bowfin Museum

USS T-3
USS T-3 at the Fore River Ship Yard


USS T-3 alongside the USS T-1
USS T-3 alongside the USS T-1


USS T-3 on sea trials
USS T-3 on sea trials.
Photo provided by Rick Larson MMCM(SS) (ret.)

Crew eating in the Control room of the USS T-3
Crew eating in the Control room of the USS T-3
This is just a best guess since the T-1, T-2 & T-3 were the only subs with a test depth of 150 feet
and that is what the depth gauge is calibrated to in this picture. The submarine was in service until 1927.



Control room of the USS T-3
Control room of the USS T-3


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USS T-3 on December 23, 1925 with Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Theodore Douglas Robinson with wife Helen and three of their daughters aboard inspecting the submarine. Daughter, Alida, is looking at the camera. Daughters Helen and Elizabeth are behind Alida. Note the Christmas Tree laying on the deck waiting to be put up.

The T boats were all retired in 1922 due to poor performance. The T-3 was the first to go. On Armistice Day, November 11, 1922, she was decommissioned at Hampton Roads, Va., and berthed at the submarine base located there. Later, she was moved to Philadelphia. When a submarine was needed to test the performance of the M.A.N. German diesels. The T-1 was selected but no money was available and it was postponed. When funds were made available it was the T-3 that was chosen.

She was re-engined and on On 1 October 1925, T-3 was recommissioned at Philadelphia. For the following 21 months, she tested her newly installed 3,000-horsepower M.A.N. diesel engines for the Bureau of Engineering. Early in the summer of 1927, she completed the tests and, on 14 July 1927, was placed out of commission at Philadelphia. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 19 September 1930 and her hulk was broken up, and the materials sold for scrap on 20 November 1930.

Library Of Congress Photo.


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USS T-3 on December 23, 1925 with Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Theodore Douglas Robinson and wife Helen aboard inspecting the submarine, seen here with three of their daughters. Daughter, Alida, is looking at the camera. Daughters Helen and Elizabeth are behind Alida

Theodore "Teddy" Robinson had deep roots in American politics and was directly and through marriage related to the Roosevelt's. He was also the great-great-grandnephew of James Monroe (1758-1831), fifth President of the United States; great-grandson of James Monroe (1799-1870); son of Douglas Robinson and Corinne (Roosevelt) Robinson (1861-1933; poet); nephew of Theodore Roosevelt; married 1904 to Helen Roosevelt, distant cousin of Franklin D Roosevelt and Theodore Roosevelt. Her father was a half brother of the late President Franklin D Roosevelt.

Library Of Congress Photo.


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The USS T-3 interior photographed in December 1925. Looking forward in the torpedoroom. The four 18 inch torpedo tubes are visible at the forward most end of the room. The tubes are 17 feet 4 inches long and could fire the the Bliss-Levitt MK 9 and MK 10 torpedoes with a range up to 4000 yards.

Ther are no torpedoes in this photo since the T-3 was brought back into commission strictly to test the German M.A.N. diesels with no intention for it to return as a fighting vessel. The space is being utilized for berthing and all the equipment for storing torpedoes has been removed.

The large black object in the overhead of the room is the motor for running the anchor and deck capstan. On the left in the photo, above the bunks is a valve manifold that is believed to be the forward fuel filling and transfer manifold. At the very top of the photo, above the light, is the transfer box for the control rod for the bow planes. At this point the mechanical torque from the rod is turned 90 degrees and exits the pressure hull through bushings and a glad seal. Stuffed in the overhead behind pipes and wires are life jackets.

Forward of the bunks on the right side of the photo is a desk with a typewriter on it. It was first thought this was used for radio equipment but after examining the photo of the radio space that opinion has been discarded. It could have been used for maintaining ships records by the ships clerk or Yeoman, or, maybe have been installed for use during the trials. A portable electric space heater seen on the deck by the table leg and bottom torpedo tube door.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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The USS T-3 interior photographed in December 1925. A closer view of the torpedo tubes and forward starboard corner of the room. There is still no clearer view of the desk but for this photo the space heater has been moved. The power cord for the heater can been seen descending from the overhead and running along the deck. It is not known what the second cord seen on the deck is for or where it comes from though it seems to be the same size as the heater cord.

The large valves and piping seen on the right, forward of the desk, are supposed to be part of the Trim and Drain system used for moving trimming water, (read weight), from and to the forward trim tank or to other tanks or from or to sea from the submarine. This system also combined the ability to pump the bilges.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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The USS T-3 interior photographed in December 1925. Close up of the torpedo tube doors and associated valving. The tubes are numbered, top to bottom and right to left. Looking at the photo the top tube on the right is number 1. The top tube on the left is number 2. The bottom tube on the right is number 3 and the bottom left is number 4. This numbering system is still in use today.

Above the top tier of tube doors are seen the manual tube firing levers. One each for each tube and be seen at the 10 o'clock and 2 o'clock positions above each door. The round valve handles above the doors separate the manual firing levers. The handles point up. When the command to fire is given the valve is pulled. If the electrical firing control in the control room fails, the manual will actuate the impulse air to the tube and eject the torpedo.

Between the tubes is a small arc shaped plate and just below these is a stub end for a handle. A large lever is placed over this and turned to open and close the the torpedo tube shutter doors used to fair the tube openings with the hull and protect the outer doors from damage.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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The USS T-3 interior photographed in December 1925. Close up of the desk area. It shows little more than was seen previously. Its true purpose remains a mystery. The portable electric space heater is clearly seen.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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The USS T-3 interior photographed in December 1925. This the torpedoroom looking aft. The ladder to the deck through a deck hatch. The Ladder is backed by a kick cloth that stops a persons foot from sliding through a rung. It also prevents dirt from shoes from scattering all over the deck.

The large black object in the overhead is the capstan motor. Just to the right of the ladder in the overhead is an oxygen flask. Just to the right of that is the end of the bow planes control rod. Life jackets are stuffed into available spaces throughout the overhead.

Behind and above the tipped up bunks on the right is the forward fuel filling manifold.

At the far end of the compartment is a desk area. A reference library and the ships safe. Stacked on top of the safe are containers of soda lime that in time of need can be open and spread on bunks or the deck to absorb CO2 from the atmosphere. Barely seen on the deck behind the bunks on the left side is another portable electric space heater.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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The USS T-3 interior photographed in December 1925. Close up of the Forward fuel filling manifold viewed from the aft.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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The USS T-3 interior photographed in December 1925. The forward fuel filling manifold seen from forward side. Fuel tanks were spread all along the length of the submarine in the low points and void spaces under the walking decks and under the engines at the aft. There was a loading station at the fore and aft areas of the boat to allow faster loading of fuel.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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The USS T-3 interior photographed in December 1925. The actual radio space but where it was actually located in the T-3 is up for speculation. It looks that communication was by both key and voice as the curved object in the center of the desk is an early microphone.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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The USS T-3 interior photographed in December 1925. The wardroom on the T-Boats was located in the after portion of the torpedo room. You can see the contrast between how the officers lived and the general crew. The "furniture" is highly varnished mahogany. Polished brass rails and leather upholstered settees.

This view is looking forward. Over the door to the torpedo room proper is a depth gauge. It only measures to 100 feet though the actual test depth of the "T" class was 200 feet. Folding camp chairs were used for general seating and for eating at the wardroom table. Ashtrays are placed down the center of the table since smoking very common in this time period.

The table itself is covered by a heavy table cloth, most probably dark green in color as that is a traditional color for this cloth in the US Navy. The cloth has a fancy trim around the edge, possibly gold in color. Hanging in the overhead is an electrical cord with a socket fitting probably for a clothing iron to press clothing, using the wardroom table as the ironing surface.

The dark rod seen in the overhead to left is a curtain rod to block off the berths from the rest of the space. The rings for hanging this curtain can be seen at the far end of the rod. Next to it is the drive shaft for the bow planes.

The best as can be figured out about the two hydraulic motors in the overhead is they are used to lift spare torpedo bodies and warheads stored under the wardroom decks.

Detail images of most of these things are following.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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The USS T-3 interior photographed in December 1925. Close-up of the depth gauge over the door into the torpedo room proper. It is registering about 15 feet. Since depth is measured from the keel we now know the T-3 has a draft of that depth.

Books in the ships library and used for reference are stored in the wardroom. Next to the depth gauge a large power cord can be seen draped over several pipes. This is for one of the numerous portable space heaters. The heater is hidden by the table. A reading lamp can be seen to the right of the book case.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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The USS T-3 interior photographed in December 1925. Close-up of the curtain rod and bunk area. The rings used to hang the curtain are seen at the far end of the rod. To the left, over the bunk is seen a reading light for use when the compartment is darkened for sleeping. The curtain blocking the light from others. The drive shaft for the bow planes, one of its universal joints visible in the center.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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The USS T-3 interior photographed in December 1925. Close-up of the cord stored in the overhead, probably used with a clothing iron. The officers clothing would have been maintained by a stewardsmate who would have used this iron to press shirts, pants and jackets. They also made up the bunks and served the meals to the officers. At this time most stewards would have been either Chinese, Japanese or from Guam or Hawaii, the Philippines or even Puerto Rico. Few blacks were being accepted into the Navy at this time.

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Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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The USS T-3 interior photographed in December 1925. The Officers wardroom viewed from the front of the compartment looking aft. In the center of the photo is the watertight door leading into the crews berthing spaces.

On either side of this door are, to the right, an area for hanging uniform. In the earlier "T" class these were separate lockers and on the opposite side of the door. To the left of the door is another door. This leading to the Officers Head.

To the left of the door are a number of items. A large pipe running over the door and down the left side to a bell is a speaking tube. The bell is to let let the wardroom know someone wants to talk. Below the bell are the compartment light switches. Below these, close to the bottom of the door is a dogging bar used to tighten the dogs on the watertight door as tight as possible.

To the left of these is a bit of 1920's art or maybe "cheesecake". Above is a Chelsea clock, the time is 2:35, (probably PM). The power cord for a portable space heater is seen next to the left. Heater is seen at the end of the table.

The door to the officers head is next. A large varnished mahogany closet is at the left.


Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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The USS T-3 interior photographed in December 1925. Close up of the overhead with the power cord for a clothing iron. To the left is an air flask for what purpose is not known.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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The USS T-3 interior photographed in December 1925. Close-up of watertight door area. showing the picture. The Chelsea clock showing 2:35 o'clock. The speaking tube with bell and the portable space heater. In the upper right corner is a battle lantern. probably wired to come on with the loss of electrical power.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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The USS T-3 interior photographed in December 1925. Close-up of the bow planes drive shaft and the curtain rod. The large tube on the right that also splits off to the left is the speaking tube. The portion on the right runs forward to the torpedo room.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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The USS T-3 interior photographed in December 1925. Close-up of two of the officers bunks complete with polished brass sea rails and high gloss varnished mahogany. In the overhead over the top bunk is a reading light turned to run fore to aft. Brass clothing hooks and a hanging area for uniforms at the aft end of the compartment. The space under the bunks is no doubt clothing storage also.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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The USS T-3 interior photographed in December 1925. Close-up of the clothing hook and varnished wood. The reflection of the hook can be seen in the surface to the right of the hook itself.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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The USS T-3 interior photographed in December 1925. This photo is looking forward looking up the port side of the forward crews berthing compartment. Through the door at the far end you are looking into the Officers berthing and wardroom space.

The deck is the covering over the forward battery. It is shellacked and painted canvas stretched over wood boards fastened over the batteries. The decks have been reported to have been colored green. All the bunks and other equipment is suspended from the overhead so as to not have any punctures on the canvas decking.

If you look closely through the watertight door into the wardroom you will see that it is a double "airlock" type door. There is a space of about 4 or 5 feet between the doors. This space accommodates officers hanging lockers and the officers head. There is a second head in the engineroom for the crew. The large shaft in the overhead is the drive rod for the bow planes.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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The USS T-3 interior photographed in December 1925. This photo looks aft on the starboard side of the forward crews berthing. Behind the camera is the officers wardroom.

Crews lockers for clothing and personal items line the left side of the photo. At the far end of the compartment the square box with holes is a portable electric space heater. The power cable for the heater bows out to the left of the unit and drapes over the battery blower motor and proceeds to an outlet in the overhead.

A folding camp stool and the large round object on the bulkhead is one of the ventilation blowers for the battery well below the deck.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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The USS T-3 interior photographed in December 1925. This photo is taken in the aft crews berthing compartment that is just aft of the forward berthing compartment. This view is looking aft down the starboard side towards the galley. Tables for eating are seen under the berths on the right in the photo. These table are folding and are stored out of the way when not in use underway. They are covered by what was called "oil cloth" table cloths. There was no plastic for this purpose in 1925. In the angle between the table top and the bunk can be seen the hand of an officer, a lieutenant, probably escorting the photographer.

At the aft end of the compartment is a battery well ventilation blower. What looks to maybe be a gyrocompass is in the the left corner of the space behind the railing. On the deck a large connector box seems to have very large power cables associated with it, no doubt coming from the battery. A power cord snakes across the deck, probably for the lights used in making this photo.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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The USS T-3 interior photographed in December 1925. This view is looking down the port side of the compartment. Another battery well blower can be seen on the aft bulkhead. Messing tables are seen to the left and books are held in a shelf on the bulkhead. What looks to be a desk of some sorts is at the end of the lockers on the right. This may be the navigation desk.

The hold downs for stretching and holding the canvas deck in place can be seen at the bottom of the photo below the lockers. Some sort of meter, probably associated with the battery is on the bulkhead, and it looks to have a hand held stitch for using it.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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USS T-3 in December of 1925. This is the Galley of the USS T-3. The T-3 was brought back into commission to test the German M.A.N. diesels. The testing was going to involve a crew living aboard at sea while the tests were ongoing. These men were going to need feeding.

The photo was taken from the starboard side of a passageway, that was the scullery space where dishes were washed, looking to the port side into the galley proper. The galley was physically located in the forward end of the control room. The water tight doors leading out of both ends of control were double airlock doors meant to isolate control from the rest of the submarine. One of these doors can be seen on the right of the photo with the "porthole" in it.

The galley doesn't have a look of being in use at this time. On the right is the ships coffee pot. To the left is the ships range with oven. Directly across, in front of the camera, is the food preparation area.

Just below the coffee pot can be seen a large bolt. This seems to line up with a hole drilled in the large horizontal bar on the back of the watertight door just below the deadlight or "porthole". Probably to hole the door open.

On the near side of the ships stove there appears to be a water boiler but the glass sight tubes seem to be missing on the front of the boiler. Above the stove on the bulkhead is a storage box probably for spices like salt, pepper and the like. A hook full of frying pans hang from a hook hooked over a pipe that runs through the galley.

Almost unseen, a ring of keys hang from the coffee pot spout. A number of padlocks can be seen hanging from locker doors. No doubt the policy of not restricting crew from access to food was not something that had come into effect in 1925. On the deck, below the coffee pot is another large cooking pot that looks to be the twin of the one on the stove top.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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USS T-3 in December of 1925. This is the Galley of the USS T-3.

.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


Hold Mouse Over Image
To Scroll the Image Use Mouse Wheel

USS T-3 in December of 1925. This is the Galley of the USS T-3.

.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


Hold Mouse Over Image
To Scroll the Image Use Mouse Wheel

USS T-3 in December of 1925. This is the Galley of the USS T-3.

.

Photo courtesy of Sean Hert via Mike Mohl and Navsource.org.


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