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The S-Boats
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USS S-20 in unknown location
USS S-20 SS 125 at the US Naval Acadamy in July of 1945
while on her way to Philadelphia to be decommissioned.
The barracks ship in the background is the Cumberland (IX-8).

Many thanks to Gary Priolo of NAVSOURCE for identifying the location and the Cumberland.
USS S-20 in the Canal Zone
USS S-20 SS 125 in the Canal Zone. The S-20 was used as a test
platform for the "new" fleet submarine bow design.
USS S-20 SS 125
USS S-20 SS125
USS S-20 SS 125 underway
USS S-20 SS125 underway
Photo provided by Stan Lintner, his father, Harold Lintner, served aboard the H-8 as a Chief Radioman
USS S-20 torpedo room door
USS S-20 torpedo room door. Officer entering torpedoroom.
Photo provided by Stan Lintner, his father, Harold Lintner, served aboard the H-8 as a Chief Radioman
USS S-20 torpedo room loading torpedo in tube
USS S-20 torpedo room. Loading torpedo into a torpedo tube.
Photo provided by Stan Lintner, his father, Harold Lintner, served aboard the H-8 as a Chief Radioman
USS S-20 crews berthing area
USS S-20 crews berthing area.
Photo provided by Stan Lintner, his father, Harold Lintner, served aboard the H-8 as a Chief Radioman
USS S-20 navigators
USS S-20 navigators. Quartermaster and Navigation officer plot a position.
Photo provided by Stan Lintner, his father, Harold Lintner, served aboard the H-8 as a Chief Radioman
USS S-20 dive station
USS S-20 dive station.
Diving Officer keeps track of the bow and stern planesmen as they hold depth.
Photo provided by Stan Lintner, his father, Harold Lintner, served aboard the H-8 as a Chief Radioman
USS S-20 crewsmess
USS S-20 crewsmess. Crew at one of 4 meals served each day at sea.
Photo provided by Stan Lintner, his father, Harold Lintner, served aboard the H-8 as a Chief Radioman
USS S-20 engineroom
USS S-20 engineroom.
Photo provided by Stan Lintner, his father, Harold Lintner, served aboard the H-8 as a Chief Radioman
USS S-20 crewman working in the engineroom
USS S-20 crewman working outboard an engine in the engineroom
The curve of the hull can be seen on the right side of the photo.
Photo provided by Stan Lintner, his father, Harold Lintner, served aboard the H-8 as a Chief Radioman
USS S-20 maneuvering room
USS S-20 maneuvering room.
This is where the electrical power was distributed throughout the boat.
The large wheels controled the flow of electricity to the motors from the batteries.
Photo provided by Stan Lintner, his father, Harold Lintner, served aboard the H-8 as a Chief Radioman
USS S-20 battery charging and distribution panel
USS S-20 battery charging and distribution panel.
Electrician pointing out features of the system to new crew members.
Photo provided by Stan Lintner, his father, Harold Lintner, served aboard the H-8 as a Chief Radioman
USS S-20 bow viewed through the periscope
USS S-20 bow viewed through the periscope.
A fairly choppy sea can be seen running.
Photo provided by Stan Lintner, his father, Harold Lintner, served aboard the H-8 as a Chief Radioman
USS S-21 SS 126
USS S-21 SS 126
USS S-21 with civilians on board.
USS S-21 with civilians on board. Could be a dependents cruise
or some dignitaries. Woman standing next to deck gun has high heels on.

Civilians and S-21 deck gun
Civilians and S-21 deck gun. Notice woman with high heeled shoes

USS S-22 SS 127
USS S-22 SS 127
USS S-22 SS 127
USS S-22 SS 127
Inscription reads: "Portsmouth, N.H. USS Submarine S-22 General View Forward looking aft.
Showing Changes in the Superstructure (Marker Buoy and Escape Hatch and Lifting eyes)
November 21, 1929." This was probably in response to the 1923 sinking and recovery of the
USS O-5 and the 1927 sinking with the loss of all hands and recovery of the USS S-4 in 1928.
The problems with getting pontoons and buoys attached to the hulls to lift the submarines
was a real issue. The attaching of the lifting eyes to the hull was one answer to this.
USS S-22 with the newly designed escape hatch
USS S-22 with the newly designed escape hatch.
Milne Special Collections, University of New Hampshire Library, Durham, N.H.

A Navy Lt is operating the side egress door.
A Navy Lt. is operating the side egress door.
Milne Special Collections, University of New Hampshire Library, Durham, N.H.

Close up of excape hatch
Close up of escape hatch mechanisms
Milne Special Collections, University of New Hampshire Library, Durham, N.H.

Stern of the S-22 showing marker bouy and engineroom hatch
November 21, 1929.
Stern of the S-22 showing the marker buoy and the motor room escape hatch.
Milne Special Collections, University of New Hampshire Library, Durham, N.H.

USS S-22 moored in New York. Date unknown.
USS S-22 moored in New York City, circa the 1930s.
 Inboard submarines are (left-to-right):
 R-1 (SS-78); R-13 (SS-90) and R-4 (SS-81).
S-22 with R boats
S-22 with R boats, (see above)

USS S-22 at gunnery practice circa 1938 or 1939. The ASR to the right of the photo is towing four naval artillery targets that can be seen in the center of the photo just below the horizon line as four white dots. Just to the left of the targets is what could be the splash from the just fired round. Over the gun crew on deck and forward of the bridge the smoke from the just fired round can still be seen.

From an original photo negative in the Private Collection of Ric Hedman

USS S-22 at gunnery practice circa 1938 or 1939. The naval artillery targets that can be seen just below the horizon line as four white dots are the focus for attention of the gun crew on the deck of the USS S-22. Just to the left of the targets is what could be the splash from the just fired round. Over the gun crew on deck and forward of the bridge the smoke from the just fired round can still be seen as a dark smudge.

From an original photo negative in the Private Collection of Ric Hedman

S-22 Officers & Crew 1941
S-22 Officers & Crew 1941.
Officers, seated in front center, are (left-to-right):
Lieutenant Joseph F. Enright , USN;
Lieutenant Commander George H. Wales , USN, CO;
Lieutenant Ernest S. Friedrick , USN;
Ensign Alvin E. Kirstein , USNR.
Harold Lintner, CRM  just to the left of the two black Stewardsmates

USS S-24 in heavy seas.
USS S-24 in heavy seas. Location unknown, circa 1920's
Photo provided by John Marsh. His father, John Rodney Marsh collected the photo  while on a reserve cruise in the early twenties.

USS S-25 in a 1933 photo
USS S-25 in a 1933 photo

USS S-25 crew in 1936
USS S-25 crew on January 22, 1936

USS S-25 crew
USS S-25 crew

USS S-25 crew
USS S-25 crew

USS S-25 crew
USS S-25 crew

USS S-25 crew
USS S-25 crew

Deep Dive certificate
Deep Dive certificate, USS S-25. Depth of 213 feet.

Deep Dive certificate close up
Deep Dive certificate close up.
Date of dive is given as February 28, 1935
at 213 feet in depth at Lat. 20 - 44 - 54N
and Long 156 - 35 - 57 W off Lahaina, Territory of Hawaii.


Moored at St. Thomas US V.I.
USS S-25 moored at St. Thomas US V.I. circa 1920's

Moored at St. Thomas US V.I.
USS S-25 moored at St. Thomas US V.I.
Crew close-up. Man just to the right of the "5" is drawing water with a bucket from over the side.
Other crew are relaxing in the shade. circa 1920's

Moored at St. Thomas US V.I.
USS S-25 moored at St. Thomas US V.I.
Crew close-up. Crew is doing laundry and airing bedding. circa 1920's

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On September 9 of 1925 the USS S-25 and S-28 and another S class submarine were visiting San Francisco, Ca. (the other submarine, possibly the S-26, the conning tower can be seen behind the S-28). The submarines are seen here moored to the Submarine Tender USS Savannah AS-8.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman - NOT a Navy Photo

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On September 9 of 1925 the USS S-25 and S-28 and another S class submarine were visiting San Francisco, Ca. (the other submarine, possibly the S-26, can be seen to the rear of the 25 & 28 boats). The submarines are seen here moored to the Submarine Tender USS Savannah AS-8.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman - NOT a Navy Photo

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On September 9 of 1925 the USS S-25 and S-28 are seen here moored to the Submarine Tender USS Savannah AS-8 while visiting San Francisco, Ca. The crew of the S-28 has been washing laundry and and it can be seen drying from the jack stays rigged for that purpose. Crew from the Savannah can be seen on deck looking down on to their charges.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman - NOT a Navy Photo

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On September 9 of 1925 the USS S-25 and S-28 are seen here moored to the Submarine Tender USS Savannah AS-8 while visiting San Francisco, Ca. The crew of the S-28 has been washing laundry and and it can be seen drying from the jack stays rigged for that purpose. The rear attachment of the jack stay can be seen attached to the davit on the starboard gundeck sponson. An unidentified ship is moored to the left in the photo. Civilian visitors can be seen on the S-25 decks.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman - NOT a Navy Photo

s-25 during turning over ceremony to Polish Navy
S-25 during turning over ceremony to Polish Navy.
The boat renamed ORP Jastrzab (ORP means Okret Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej,
or Polish Republic Ship; Jastrzab is Polish for Hawk)
Photo provided by Leszek Erenfeicht of Poland

Raising the Polish flag
Raising the Polish flag on the newly commisioned
submarine Jastrazab (ex-S-25) of the Polish Navy.
Photo provided by Leszek Erenfeicht of Poland

Polish sailors relaxing
Polish sailors relaxing on the newly commisioned submarine Jastrazab (ex-S-25).
Photo provided by Leszek Erenfeicht of Poland

Photo from the bridge
Photo taken from the bridge of the submarine Jastrazab (ex-S-25).
Photo provided by Leszek Erenfeicht of Poland

New Commanding Officer
The new Commanding Officer,
Kapitan (Polish for full Lt.) Boleslaw Romanowski
of the submarine Jastrazab (ex-S-25) with US sailor in New London.
Photo provided by Leszek Erenfeicht of Poland

S-26 in San Diego harbor
USS S-26 in San Diego harbor circa 1930's

S-26 crewman  on bow
S-26 crewman standing on bow. It apears he is holding a "heevy"
(a light weight line weighted to toss to the pier or other vessel),
used to haul a heavier line used to moor a vessel.

S-26 sailors cleaning deck gun barrel.
The USS S-26 sailors cleaning deck gun barrel.
The submarine must have been out at gun practice for the
day and the crew are cleaning it with a ramrod cleaning tool.

S-26 bridge detail
S-26 bridge detail.

Line handlers on back deck.
Line handlers on back deck.
A ships gig with officers in it is seen in the background.

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Three survivors of the sinking of the USS S-26. The men, who were all on the bridge at the time of the ramming by the Anti-Submarine Patrol Craft PC-460 are, L to Right are Lt. Robert E. M. Ward, XO of the S-2; LCdr. Earle C. Hawk, Captain of the S-26 and on far right is Seaman Joe B. Hurst, lookout from the S-26. Between LCdr Hawk and Seaman Hurst is Captain T. J. Doyle who was in charge of the rescue operations. The men are looking at a buoy launched by the men still trapped in the submarine. The men were never rescued and remain entombed in the sunk submarine 301 feet deep.

LCdr Hawk went on to place the USS Pompon (267) in commission in March 1943 as her Commanding Officer. Lt Ward went on to eventually command Sailfish (SS 192). It is not known where Seaman Hurst went after the sinking. By all accounts he survived the war.

On 24 January 1942 PC-460 mistook submarine USS S-26 (SS-131) at night for a German U-boat. PC-460 rammed and sank her in the Gulf of Panama, with the loss of 46 men. Three men in S-26's conning tower survived - the captain, his executive officer and a look-out.

From A Photo in the Collection of Ric Hedman


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The PC-460, seen here in 1943 after her bow had been repaired from the ramming and sinking of the USS S-26. On 24 January 1942 PC-460 mistook submarine USS S-26 (SS-131) at night for a German U-boat. PC-460 rammed and sank her in the Gulf of Panama, with the loss of 46 men. Three men in S-26's conning tower survived - the captain, his executive officer and a look-out.

US Navy Photo


S-27 SS 132
S-27 SS 132
Click here for a nice S-27 web page with interior shots.

USS S-27 in Dry Dock circa 1925
USS S-27 SS 132
In Dry Dock circa 1930, possibly Mare Island Shipyard since the boats
with her in the dry dock were all reported to be at Mare Island at that time too.

5 S-boats in dry dock together. circa 1925 Mare Island
5 S-boats in dry dock together. circa 1930, Mare Island.
L - R: Possibly the USS S-19 and USS S-18 as well as USS S-27
The two S-boats aft of these can not be identified.

USS S-28 SS 133
USS S-28 SS 133

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The USS S-28 seen here on on a post refit trials and photo op. The submarine seems to have a port list. The date of the photo is June 24, 1943 in Sinclair Inlet. Bremerton Navy Yard, where her refit was performed, is off screen to the right. To the left background is the town of Port Orchard. Behind and to the right of the submarine can be seen four barges with barrage balloons moored to them. To the left of the submarine is one of the small wooden freighters that plied the Puget Sound waters up into the late 1950's carrying cargo to ports around the sound. She seems to have just left Port Orchard. They were painted orange and black.

The S-28's refit included work to her electrical systems including replacement of battery well boxes and supports. Overhauling all battery blowers, recalibration of hydrogen detectors, repair leaking water tanks. Inspection of Port Main Motor. Overhaul of the engine order telegraphs and gyro compass. Checking and timing of the engines, rebabbitt and align shafts and on for seven more pages of work to be done. The S-boats were old and were worked hard needed much work to keep them in the war.

Puget Sound Navy Yard Photo / NARA Seattle Collection


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The USS S-28 seen here stern on on a post refit trials and photo op. The submarine still seems to have a port list. The view is basically looking east. The date of the photo is June 24, 1943 in Sinclair Inlet. Bremerton Navy Yard, where her refit was performed, is off screen to the left and behind the photographer.

To the left background is Bainbridge Island and Point White as well as more island seen dead head of the submarine. To the right of the submarine is seen Waterman Point. Between the two points, in front of the submarine, is Rich Passage, a route that the Seattle to Bremerton Ferry's take. It is approximately one hour by ferry to Seattle from this position. The passage turns to the photos right (south) and then continues east, around the south end of the island, and into Puget Sound and on to Seattle.

Puget Sound Navy Yard Photo / NARA Seattle Collection


USS S-29
The USS S-29 (SS 134) circa 1930's
The crew has pulled what apears to be a deck hatch open and are stowing mooring lines in it.
The USS S-29 was a Lend Lease boat to Great Britain in WW II and served as the H.M.S. P556.
After the war she was to be scraped but ran aground off Portsmouth, England.
The hull was still intact as late as 1976.
She was then cut up and taken to Spain as scrap in 1986-1987.

S-30 at Annapolis
S-30 at Annapolis, MD 1938

USS S-30 SS 135
USS S-30 SS 135
Harry Fields sitting at a deck gun position.
Photo courtesy of Carolyn Fields Snider whose Uncle, Harry Fields took the photos or is in them.


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Ric Hedman 1999 - 2011©
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