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The F-Boats

USS F-4 , F-2, F-3 and F-1
USS F-4 , F-2, F-3 and F-1 and crews photographed in Hawaii in 1914.

All 4 F-Class submarines
All 4 F-Class submarines pictured from the stern.
Identities of which boat is which is not possible but if
taken at about the same time as the above photo,
it would be L to R: F-1, F-3, F-2 & F-4..


The four F-boats in Honolulu
The four F-boats docked in Honolulu

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A very commonly reproduced photo of the USS F-2, F-1 and the ill-fated F-4 moored, most likely, at Pier 6 in Honolulu Harbor. The photo was taken after the arrival of the F-Class submarines in Hawaii in the summer of 1914 and the March 25, 1915 sinking of the F-4. The four F-Boats were towed to Hawaii by the cruisers South Dakota and West Virginia.

The flat land area seen in the background is Sand Island. The building/lighthouse seen on the left is marking the inner entrance channel to the harbor. On the right the large building is the Quarantine Docks where ships from over seas were moored until cleared by the health inspectors. When the F-4 was finally raise after her sinking, that took the lives of all her crew, her first stop was at these docks still hanging from chains under the lifting pontoons while a dry dock was made available.

Pearl Harbor at this time was mainly a coaling station for larger ships and the submarine base there wasn't ready until 1920 so the submarine fleet moored normally at Piers 5 & 5A near the entrance to Honolulu Harbor.

US Navy Photo


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All four "F" Class submarine moored to the tender USS Alert in Honolulu Harbor, circa early 1915. The F-4 sank on March 25, 1915. This might be one of the last known F-4 photos prior to her loss with all hands. The USS Alert arrived in Hawaii in early 1915 in company with four K-Class submarines.

Photo provided by Rick Larson MMCM(SS) (ret.).


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The three remaining F class submarines after the sinking of the USS F-4. They are moored at the Navy Piers in Honolulu Harbor on what appears to be a clam sunny morning. Before the trade winds pick-up it can be hot and humid there. The lighthouse on Sand Island can be seen in the background. The crews are cleaning the submarines up for a Captains Inspection. The three submarines were prohibited from diving after the pressure hull collapsed on the F-4 from corrosion caused by a battery acid leak killing all 19 crew. A group of 5 or 6 young men sit and watch the activity. Probably curious about submarines in the wake of the F-4's sinking. The submarines were later towed back to the mainland being replaced by the newer and more reliable K class submarines.

Photo in the collection of Ric Hedman


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A closer look at the USS F-1 and F-3 moored at the Navy Piers in Honolulu Harbor. The crews are cleaning the submarines up for a Captains Inspection. The three remaining submarines were prohibited from diving after the pressure hull collapsed on the F-4 from corrosion caused by a battery acid leak killing all 19 crew. There appears to be a coaling station on a pier in the background. The bow of the F-2 can be seen at the extream right.

Photo in the collection of Ric Hedman


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Moored aft of the F-1 and F-3 is the USS F-2. A group of sailors take shelter from the morning sun in the shade of the fairwater on the F-3. The lighthouse on Sand Island can be seen in the background.

Photo in the collection of Ric Hedman


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A group of young men caught in the moment watching the submarines. It would be interesting to know what they thought of those submarines and men sailing them.

Photo in the collection of Ric Hedman


USS F-1
The USS F-1  (ex-Carp) SS 20

USS F-1 aground
USS F-1 aground off Watsonville, Ca, Oct. 11, 1912
Two men were killed in the accident. F-1 was salvaged
only to later sink in a collision with her sister ship F-3.

Photo had been previously misidentified as the USS H-3.

USS F-1 aground
USS F-1 aground off Watsonville, Ca, Oct. 11, 1912
Photo had been previously misidentified as the USS H-3.

F-1 & F-4 moored to the starboard side of the USS Alert, San Pedro, Ca
F-1 & F-4 moored to the starboard side of the USS Alert, San Pedro, Ca.
The submarines were part of the First Submarine Group of the Pacific Torpedo Flotilla.
Photo circa; 1912 to 1914.

Postcard about F-1
Postcard written by a sailor assigned to the F-1 in March of 1913.
The card reads exactly as follows, misspellings an all:
San Dieago, Cal. March 1- 1913
Dear Dave
I tried to get out to see you before I left but as I shipped on the 13 - and at 10:PM I left for here - am asigned to the US Submarine F-1 for instructions 6 mon school. And if I make good a rate and one dollar a dive. Don't forget to write to a fellow ocasionally. Give my regards to the folks and many of my Best Wishes to Sis.
Your old Shipmate
J G Messary
(At the bottom of the card)
USS Submarine F-1 - SdC

USS F-1 at sea
USS F-1 on the way to California under tow.
A ships boat from the cruiser USS Maryland is bring supplies to the sub.
This was a routine that happend every few days during the tow.
The tug Iroquois is standing by in the background.
The remaining F-Boats were ordered back to the mainland after the F-4 sank.
Date November 5, 1915.

Photo provided by The Bowfin Museum

USS F-1 at sea
USS F-1 on the way to California under tow by the USS Maryland.
Here the F-1 is hove-to and repairing her towing gear.
Date November 5, 1915.

Photo in the Private Collection of Ric Hedman

USS F-1 at sea
USS F-1 on the way to California under tow by the USS Maryland.
Here the F-1 is hove-to and repairing her towing gear. Close-up view.
This photo shows the men on deck during the repair operation.
To better see the men I have shown their location with circles.
Date November 5, 1915.

Photo in the Private Collection of Ric Hedman

USS F-1 on the bottom
USS F-1 on the bottom off the California coast where she sank
after being rammed by the USS F-3 on Dec 17, 1917.
19 crew were lost in the ramming. First US war time loss of a
submarine it being during World War I. Accident happened 4 miles
West of La Jolla Light. This photo is one taken by the DSRV in 1986.

Photo provided by Rick Larson MMCM (SS) (ret.)

USS F-1 on the bottom
USS F-1 on the bottom. Photo was damaged sometime during its life.
Photo provided by Rick Larson MMCM (ret.)

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The USS F-1 resting on the bottom at 1453 feet deep after being rammed by the USS F-3.
Seen are the # 2 pericope sheer and the bridge access hatch. View from starboard side.

Thanks to Steve Lawson of California Wreck Divers for these photos.


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The USS F-1 resting on the bottom at 1453 feet deep after being rammed by the USS F-3.
Seen are the # 1 and # 2 pericope sheers and the bridge access hatch. View from port side.

Thanks to Steve Lawson of California Wreck Divers for these photos.


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The USS F-1 resting on the bottom at 1453 feet deep after being rammed by the USS F-3.
Seen is a deck access hatch. It is unclear if this is the forward or engine room hatch. View from port side.

Thanks to Steve Lawson of California Wreck Divers for these photos.


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The USS F-1 resting on the bottom at 1453 feet deep after being rammed by the USS F-3.
The forward running light stanchion and port bow diving plane.

Thanks to Steve Lawson of California Wreck Divers for these photos.


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The USS F-1 resting on the bottom at 1453 feet deep after being rammed by the USS F-3.
Hole caused by the bow of the USS F-3 in the side of the F-1 just aft of the main hatch. View from port side.

Thanks to Steve Lawson of California Wreck Divers for these photos.


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The USS F-1 resting on the bottom at 1453 feet deep after being rammed by the USS F-3.
Seen are the # 2 pericope sheer and the bridge access hatch. View from port side.

Thanks to Steve Lawson of California Wreck Divers for these photos.


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The USS F-1 resting on the bottom at 1453 feet deep after being rammed by the USS F-3.
Another view of the hole on the side of the F-1. View from port side.

Thanks to Steve Lawson of California Wreck Divers for these photos.


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The USS F-1 resting on the bottom at 1453 feet deep after being rammed by the USS F-3.
Starbord bow of the USS F-1. Hole for attaching the towing shackle can be seen.

Thanks to Steve Lawson of California Wreck Divers for these photos.


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The USS F-1 resting on the bottom at 1453 feet deep after being rammed by the USS F-3.
Allied Signal Bell and damage to port superstructure.

Thanks to Steve Lawson of California Wreck Divers for these photos.


F-2 and F-1 in dry dock
The USS F-2 and USS F-1 in dry dock. Date and location unknown.

USS F-2
The USS F-2 (ex-Barracuda) SS 21

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The USS F-2 seen here on San Francisco Bay circa 1915/16 after the return to the US from Hawaii. The three remaining F-Class were ordered back to the mainland after the sinking of the USS F-4. The F-Class were replaced by the newer K-Class submarines.

In the background can be seen the early skyline and water front of San Francisco.

Original Photo in the Private Collection of Ric Hedman


USS F-2
USS F-2

USS F-2 off San Diego, Calf.
USS F-2 off San Diego, Calf.

USS F-2 and another F-boat
The USS F-2 and F-3 along side
the USS Alert, a submarine tender.
Location where photo was taken is unknown also.

Homer 'Pat' Dilley
RM2 Homer 'Pat' Dilley aboard the USS F-2.
He is standing next to the #1 periscope shear facing aft.
Photo courtesy of Mike Dilley; whose Father, Homer 'Pat' Dilley sailed aboard the USS F-2.

Homer 'Pat' Dilley
RM2 Homer 'Pat' Dilley at his radio set aboard the USS F-2
Photo courtesy of Mike Dilley; whose Father, Homer 'Pat' Dilley sailed aboard the USS F-2.

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Some of the crew of the USS F-2 up on deck relaxing.
Boat on right is most likely the USS F-3.

Photo courtesy of Mike Dilley; whose Father, Homer 'Pat' Dilley sailed aboard the USS F-2.

The crew size was 21 men and officers. These men represent the men 'Pat' Dilley sailed
with during his tour aboard the submarine. That is why there are more than 21 images here.

Chief Petty Officer Monk Cline

'Cheefoo' Ward

'Rats' Foshia

Chief Petty Officer
'Dizzy' Bill Williams

'Dopey' Walker

'Jazz' Brown

Homer 'Pat' Dilley


'Rabbit' Russell

C. I. Short

Phil Salvadore

D. T. Short

'Gay Cat' Van Natta


G. N. Tibbits

Louie Godbout


Chief Petty Officer
R. W. Nivison

'Sitting Bull' Smith

'Socks'

Tom Henry

Lt. Conant Taylor
CO USS F-2

Campbell

Williams

Corson

Schmidt

Grey

'Cheefoo' Ward

Blankenship

'Rabbit', 'Cheese' 'Gaycat'
Some of the crew of the USS F-2.
Photos courtesy of Mike Dilley; whose Father, Homer 'Pat' Dilley sailed aboard the USS F-2.

Sub Base mascot Herman 'Jimmy Cheese' Reese
Herman 'Jimmy Cheese' Reese
This young man was the Sub Base mascot at San Pedro, California.
He was not a member of the US Navy but was allowed on the base.
Kind of a 'Big Brother' thing. He appears to be about 14 years of age.
Photos courtesy of Mike Dilley; whose Father, Homer 'Pat' Dilley sailed aboard the USS F-2.

USS F-2 in dry Dock
USS F-2 in dry dock in Long Beach, California.
Photo courtesy of Mike Dilley; whose Father, Homer 'Pat' Dilley sailed aboard the USS F-2.

USS F-2 in dry dock in Long Beach, California.
Photo courtesy of Mike Dilley; whose Father, Homer 'Pat' Dilley sailed aboard the USS F-2.

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USS F-2 bridge at sea. On the bridge, from left to right is the bridge lookout; Campbell, center is "Rats" Fohisa, who the helmsman and on the right, standing in front of the flag, is Lt. Conant Taylor, CO of the F-2. The projection on the right side is a portable 'head' for use on the surface since sanitary facilities below decks were crude to say the least. Mounted on the bridge is the signal lamp. Foreground left is the torpedo loading davit. Standing just to the right of the bridge fairwater on the back deck is a crewman, his legs and torso only are visible.

Photo courtesy of Mike Dilley; whose Father, Homer 'Pat' Dilley sailed aboard the USS F-2. ~ NOT a Public Domain Image.


Some of the Gang
Some of the 'Gang' on the F-2.
Notice the tall man in the center, a CPO, and the man
to the right of him, not a CPO, have switched hats.
Photo courtesy of Mike Dilley; whose Father, Homer 'Pat' Dilley sailed aboard the USS F-2.

Some more of the 'gang'
L to R: 'Whan'; 'Anderson'; 'Rats' Fohisa, looking at the camera;
'Lewis', smoking the pipe and 'Pat' Dilley standing in the hatch.
Photo courtesy of Mike Dilley; whose Father, Homer 'Pat' Dilley sailed aboard the USS F-2.

Photo taken at sea June 1917
Photo taken at sea in June of 1917.
Projection to side of bridge is portable "head" for use on surface.
Photo courtesy of Mike Dilley; whose Father, Homer 'Pat' Dilley sailed aboard the USS F-2.

Some of the crew
Some of the crew posing for the camera. 'Pat' Dilley is on the far left.
Photo courtesy of Mike Dilley; whose Father, Homer 'Pat' Dilley sailed aboard the USS F-2.

USS F-1, USS F-3 & USS F-2
USS F-1, USS F-3 and the USS F-2 rafted together. The USS F-4 sank in 1915.
Photo courtesy of Mike Dilley; whose Father, Homer 'Pat' Dilley sailed aboard the USS F-2.

USS F-1, USS F-3 and USS F-2
USS F-1, USS F-3 and the USS F-2 rafted together.
Photo courtesy of Mike Dilley; whose Father, Homer 'Pat' Dilley sailed aboard the USS F-2.

USS F-2 torpedo tubes
These are the USS F-2's four torpedo tubes. The "Business End" as they were called by the crew.
Photo courtesy of Mike Dilley; whose Father, Homer 'Pat' Dilley sailed aboard the USS F-2.

Some crew swimming off the stern at San Pedro
Three of the crew members of the F-2 swimming off the
stern of the F-2 at San Pedro submarine base.
Photo courtesy of Mike Dilley; whose Father, Homer 'Pat' Dilley sailed aboard the USS F-2.

Louie Godbout
Gay-Cat Van Natta, Ditty Box Rice, Rabbit Russell
Cheifie Johnston, Obie Short
George Tibbits, Homer 'Pat' Dilley
Top left: Louie Godbout   Top Right: Gay-Cat Van Natta, Ditty Box Rice & Rabbit Russell
Botton Left:  Cheifie Johnston & Obie Short   Bottom Right:  George Tibbits & Homer 'Pat' Dilley
Photo courtesy of Mike Dilley; whose Father, Homer 'Pat' Dilley sailed aboard the USS F-2.

Swim Party off the F-2 at San  Pedro, Ca
Ships gang plank is being used as a diving board rigged across the stern.
Photo courtesy of Mike Dilley; whose Father, Homer 'Pat' Dilley sailed aboard the USS F-2.

USS F-3 in frame, Seattle Construction & Dry Dock
USS F-3 in frame, Seattle Construction & Dry Dock November 3, 1909
Photo courtesy of Bill Lightfoot, author of Beneath The Surface.

USS F-3 with hull plates installed, Seattle Construction & Dry Dock
USS F-3 with hull plates installed, Seattle Construction & Dry Dock, circa 1910
Photo courtesy of Bill Lightfoot, author of Beneath The Surface.

USS F-3 near completion, Seattle Construction & Dry Dock
USS F-3 nearly finished. The rotating torpedo tube outer door casting
has been installed, Seattle Construction & Dry Dock, September 30, 1911

Photo courtesy of Bill Lightfoot, author of Beneath The Surface.

USS F-3 stern near completion, Seattle Construction & Dry Dock
USS F-3 stern nearly finished. circa 1911
Photo courtesy of Bill Lightfoot, author of Beneath The Surface.

USS F-3 stern finished, Seattle Construction & Dry Dock
USS F-3 stern finished. June 30, 1911
Photo courtesy of Bill Lightfoot, author of Beneath The Surface.

USS F-3 launch, Seattle Construction & Dry Dock
USS F-3 launch. January 6, 1912
Seattle PI Photo

Photo courtesy of Bill Lightfoot, author of Beneath The Surface.

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The USS F-3 on Elliot Bay with Seattle in the background. The shed to the left of the periscope is the building shed at the Moran Brothers Shipyard where the F-3 was built. The F-3 is going to or has just made a trial dive. A skiff from the shipyard is standing by. The hill in the background is Beacon Hill to the south of Seattle.

Photo is from the Private Family Collection of Mitchell Noll ~ NOT a Public Domain Image.


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The USS F-3 on Elliot Bay off the Seattle waterfront. The submarine is about to dive or has just surfaced from a trial dive. The yard crew making the ships trials can be seen on deck talking with the men in the skiff. Seen behind the submarine to the right is Queen Anne Hill north of the present day location of the Space Needle. To the left of the bridge fairing is Magnolia Bluff and West Point Lighthouse.

Photo is from the Private Family Collection of Mitchell Noll ~ NOT a Public Domain Image.


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The USS F-3 on Elliot Bay off the Seattle waterfront. The submarine is about to dive or has just surfaced from a trial dive. The operation is aboservered by officials from the shipyard from a launch. A skiff is attending the submarine. Seen behind the submarine to the right is Queen Anne Hill north of the present day location of the Space Needle. Behind the periscopes is Magnolia Bluff and West Point Lighthouse.

Photo is from the Private Family Collection of Mitchell Noll ~ NOT a Public Domain Image.


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The USS F-3 making her run North from Seattle up to Port Townsend, Wa for her trials there. Puget Sound is a little choppy. Barely seen through the spray is the Allied Signal Bell on the bow.

Photo is from the Private Family Collection of Mitchell Noll ~ NOT a Public Domain Image.


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The USS F-3 making her run North from Seattle up to Port Townsend, Wa as seen from the bridge area. Puget Sound is a little choppy. Barely seen through the spray is the Allied Signal Bell on the bow.

Photo is from the Private Family Collection of Mitchell Noll ~ NOT a Public Domain Image.


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The view looking aft on the USS F-3 on her run North from Seattle up to Port Townsend, Wa. The trademark white exhaust from the twin NELSECO diesels can be seen coming from the exhaust ports on either side of the hull below the flag staff.

Photo is from the Private Family Collection of Mitchell Noll ~ NOT a Public Domain Image.


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Trial crew from the Moran Shipyard pose on the bow while on the trip North to Port Townsend, Wa. The headland seen on the left is Point No Point on the Kitsap Pennisula. The man closest to the camera is Julius Francis Rausch Jr, an employee of the Moran Shipyard and original owner of these family photos.

Photo is from the Private Family Collection of Mitchell Noll ~ NOT a Public Domain Image.


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The F-3 moored to a dock on the Port Townsend waterfront. The town has changed little since this photo was taken in 1912. Most all of the buildings you see here are still in use today. The framework for the canvas bridge cover can be seen in this photo. An unidentified chief petty officer is seen on the bridge structure.

Photo is from the Private Family Collection of Mitchell Noll ~ NOT a Public Domain Image.


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The F-3 backs away from a dock on the Port Townsend waterfront. She is doing this on battery power since the diesel engines are direct drive and only go forward.The canvas bridge cover has been erected on the pipe framework at this time. In the background is seen the north end of Marrowstone Island across Port Townsend Bay. View is looking south.

Photo is from the Private Family Collection of Mitchell Noll ~ NOT a Public Domain Image.


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The F-3 having backed away from a dock at Port Townsend sits on the Bay. In the background is seen the north end of Marrowstone Island to the left and on the right is Indian Island across Port Townsend Bay. View is looking south.

Photo is from the Private Family Collection of Mitchell Noll ~ NOT a Public Domain Image.


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The F-3 running the measured mile off Indian Island. The trial crew are using various instruments and stop watches to run the course. Seen in the distance is the Kitsap Pennisula and Port Townsend. The view is looking north.

Photo is from the Private Family Collection of Mitchell Noll ~ NOT a Public Domain Image.


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The F-3 running the measured mile off Indian Island. The trial crew are logging information from the stop watches. The second man from the right is Julius Francis Rausch Jr. Seen in the distance is the Kitsap Pennisula and Port Townsend. The view is looking north.

Photo is from the Private Family Collection of Mitchell Noll ~ NOT a Public Domain Image.


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The USS F-3 on Port Townsend Bay for her performance trials. Behind is the U.S. Revenue Cutter Rush and a four masted schooner. circa June 15, 1912. Port Townsend is a town about 30 miles north of Seattle.

Photo from the Jefferson County Historical Society


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The USS F-3 on Port Townsend Bay for her performance trials. The view is looking almost due West. circa June 15, 1912. Port Townsend is a town about 30 miles north of Seattle.

Photo from the Jefferson County Historical Society


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A close-up view of the photo above. The USS F-3 on Port Townsend Bay for her performance trials. circa June 15, 1912. The view is looking almost due West. Port Townsend is a town about 30 miles north of Seattle.

Photo from the Jefferson County Historical Society


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The USS F-3 doing submerging trials on Port Townsend Bay as part of her performance trials. There appears to be two men still on the top of the conning tower so a full dive is not anticipated. circa June 15, 1912.

Photo from the Jefferson County Historical Society


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The USS F-3 doing submerging trials on Port Townsend Bay as part of her performance trials. There appears to be two men still on the top of the conning tower so a full dive is not anticipated. circa June 15, 1912.

Photo from the Jefferson County Historical Society


USS F-3 off Diamond Head, Hawaii
The USS F-3 (ex-Pickeral) SS 22 underway off Diamond Head, Territory of Hawaii

Crew of F-3 standing on deck
Crew of F-3 standing on deck. Note on the back of the photo states:
"The crew of the F-3 in their heavy weather togs.
I am the 12th from the forward end of the boat"
This photo was owned by a crewman or sent to family or friends from the person.

Superstructure of F-3
A good close-up of the superstructure of F-3 showing periscopes and radio mast.

F-3 Captain & Executive officer
F-3 Captain & Executive officer

F-3 chief petty officers
F-3 chief petty officers

F-3 Crew
F-3 Crew.
The man on the right is the one who made the notations on the original photo.

F-3 Crew
F-3 Crew

F-3 Crew
F-3 Crew

Workmen working on the F-3 while crew photo is being taken
Workmen working on the F-3 while crew photo is being taken

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The USS F-2 and F-3 in the Inter Island Dry Dock in Honolulu Harbor. The salvaged submarine F-4 was moved from this dry dock and taken to Pearl Harbor and left on the bottom in Magazine Loch for future disposal to get these two submarines into it. The F-2 took the brunt of the collision with the USS Supply when she lost power while trying to maneuver into the pier along side the submarines. The two subs are bow to bow in this photo and it is not possible to identify which is which.

See News Paper Stories below for details.

Photo from the Private Collection of Ric Hedman


Honolulu Star Bulletin, September 1915

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Honolulu Star Bulletin, September 1915


Uss F-3 tied up inboard of the USS H-3
USS F-3 tied up inboard of the USS H-3
Photo courtesy of Carolyn Fields Snider whose Uncle, Harry Fields took the photos or is in them.

Uss F-3 picking up towline

USS F-3 outside Pearl Harbor waiting to pick up her towline for the tow back to the mainland. After the sinking of the F-4 the F class subs were replaced by newer classes of subs. The subs were towed because they didn't have the range to make it on their own and were prone to break downs.

Photo from the Private Collection of Ric Hedman.

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The USS F-3 sailing through the Golden Gate November 11, 1915 after a very rough 15 day tow behind the USS Maryland. These submarines didn't have the "legs" to make a 2100 mile passage with their own fuel reserves plus engine breakdowns were a normal occurrence. They were very much still coastal vessels. The Maryland had escorted 4 "K" class submarines to Honolulu to replace the remaining "F" boats that had been recalled to the mainland as a result of the scandal in the wake of the F-4 sinking.

Behind the bridge of the submarine, barely seen on top of the point of land is the Bonita Point lighthouse. the north headland of the entrance through the Golden Gate. The body of water behind the submarines bridge and to the left of the darker headland is Bonita Cove.

On the left on the bridge, one of the two men may be the Commanding Officer, Lt.(jg) Francis W. Scanland. On the right, an enlisted man has the helm. The unusual canvas object protruding from the side of the bridge is a "head", a toilet system to be used while at sea on the surface. These submarines had rudimentary on-board toilet systems.

Photo from the Private Collection of Ric Hedman


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The USS F-3 sailing through the Golden Gate November 11, 1915. On the left on the bridge, one of the two men may be the Commanding Officer, Lt.(jg) Francis W. Scanland. On the right, an enlisted man has the helm. The unusual canvas object protruding from the side of the bridge is a "head", a toilet system to be used while at sea on the surface. These submarines had rudimentary on-board toilet systems.

Photo from the Private Collection of Ric Hedman


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The USS F-3 sailing through the Golden Gate November 11, 1915. The crew seem to be enjoying some nice weather after a very rough 15 day tow behind the USS Maryland. There was no Golden Gate Bridge at this time just the harbor headlands.

Photo from the Private Collection of Ric Hedman


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Chief Petty Officer Peacock posing for this photo on the deck of the USS F-3 aft of the bridge fairwater. Chief Peacock's rate is as a Chief Yeoman, a man who handled the subs clerical administrative duties and paperwork. There are two other submarines behind him, the classes and ID of the vessels is unknown. Photo circa 1916.

Photo from the Private Collection of Ric Hedman


USS F-4
The USS F-4 (ex-Skate) SS 23
March 25, 1915 the USS F-4 sank with all hands lost off Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii

USS F-4
The USS Skate (F-4) SS 23 in frame at the Moran Ship yard November 3, 1909.
The view is from the starboard bow.

USS F-4
The USS Skate (F-4) SS 23 in frame at the Moran Ship yard November 3, 1909.
The view is from the starboard beam.

USS F-4
The USS Skate (F-4) SS 23 at the Moran Ship yard.
The view is the same as above but taken on January 3, 1910. A good part of the hull plate has been attached.

USS F-4
The USS Skate (F-4) SS 23 stern view at the Moran Ship yard June 10, 1910.
To the left in the photo, between the wood support members, you can see the rudder and stern planes casting in place.
A Moran shipyard worker looks at the photographer as the photo is taken.

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The USS F-4 during Inclining Test at the Moran Shipyard in Seattle Washington. The date is unknown but most likely circa March 1913.

Photo from the Family Collection of Mitchell Noll


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The USS F-4, March 13, 1913, ran aground on the south side of the West Point Light House, Magnolia Bluff in the background. En-route to Port Townsend for trials the Commanding Officer, Lt. Simeon Burke Smith, explained it as a mis-judgement in steering that caused the grounding. A tug was called and the sub pulled free. It was determined there was no damage and proceeded to Port Townsend.

It must be understood that at this time in our submarine history that boats were manned by civilian yard crews and had nominal navy presence aboard while the submarine was put through its paces. Once the sub was approved for acceptence by the Navy, then Naval crews took over. Captain Smith was a former Navy submarine captain working for the Moran Shipyard.

Photo from the Family Collection of Mitchell Noll


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Photo printed in the Seattle Post Intelligencer Newspaper of March 14th 1913 showing the F-4 aground on West Point, just northwest of down town Seattle. To the left in the photo you can see under the submarines bow that her mushroom anchor has been dropped. A ladder it seems has been brought out from the West Point lighthouse to allow the captain, Lt. Simeon Burke Smith, to climb down and call for a tug using the telephone from the lighthouse. She was subsequently pulled of the beach on the next high tide by the tug Pioneer from the Puget Sound Tug Boat Company.

Photo from the Seattle Post Intelligencer Archive


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Another photo printed in the Seattle Post Intelligencer Newspaper of March 14th 1913 showing the F-4 aground on West Point, just northwest of down town Seattle. To the left in the photo you can see under the submarines bow that her mushroom anchor has been dropped. A ladder it seems has been brought out from the West Point lighthouse to allow the captain, Lt. Simeon Burke Smith, to climb down and call for a tug using the telephone from the lighthouse. She was subsequently pulled of the beach on the next high tide by the tug Pioneer from the Puget Sound Tug Boat Company.

Photo from the Seattle Post Intelligencer Archive


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The USS F-4, moored outboard the USS Davis, Torpedo Boat 12 and USS Fox, Torpedo Boat 13 at Port Townsend, Washington. Which is which I can't tell from this photo. I remember coastal steamers like the one in the background from my earliest days on Puget Sound as a child.

Photo from the Family Collection of Mitchell Noll


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The USS F-4, making a 200 foot dive in Seattle Harbor, (Elliott Bay). West Seattle can be seen in the background, circa April 1913 after returning from trials on Port Townsend Bay.

The process was to make a shallow dive, like seen in this photo, achieve a neutral buoyancy and then drop the mushroom anchor housed under the bow to the bottom and slowly winch the submarine down to depth. Twenty-four hours later the sub returned to the surface. All through her trials the F-4 was plagued by numerous failures of mechanical systems but these were considered "normal and acceptable" for that time. The F-4 was commissioned May 3, 1913 in Seattle with Ens. Kirkwood Donovin Commanding and the illfated Ens. Alfred Ede as XO. He was to perish as the F-4 Commanding Officer with the rest of the F-4 crew two years later off Honolulu Harbor.

Photo from the Family Collection of Mitchell Noll


USS F-4 and another F-boat
The USS F-4 and another F-class submarine dockside.
The unidentified boat is probably the F-2 or F-3 since the F-1 had a large
dome on her deck. Notice the spar bouys stacked on the dock.
The back of the card reads;
"Here is a picture of the Submarine
F4 which sank in the harbor here, with 21 men on board. I suppose
you read about it in the papers. The Maryland is here now getting it up."


These Crew Photos Have Been Contributed To The COMSUBPAC Page About The F-4
Crew of the F-4
George T. Ashcroft,GM1 Clark G. Buck, GM2 Ernest C. Cauvin, MM2 Harley Colwell, EMC
Walter F.Covington,MM1 George L. Deeth, EM1 Alfred L. Ede, LT (CO) Frederick Gilman, GM1
Aliston H. Grindle,EMC Frank N. Herzog, EM2 Edwin S. Hill, MM1 Francis M. Hughson,MM1
Albert F. Jennie, EM2 Archie H. Lunger, GM2 Ivan L. Mahan, MM1 Horace L. Moore, GM1
William S. Nelson, MMC Timothy Parker,Ens( XO) Frank C. Pierard, GMC Charles H. Wells, MM2
Henry A. Withers, GM1
LT Alfred L. Ede Commanding Officer
LT Alfred L. Ede, Commanding Officer
Harley Colwell EMC
Harley Colwell EMC
Edwin S. Hill, MM1
Edwin S. Hill, MM1
George L. Deeth, EM1
George L. Deeth, EM1
Frank C. Pierard, GMC
Frank C. Pierard, GMC
Francis M. Hughson,MM1
Francis M. Hughson,MM1
Archie H. Lunger, GM2
Archie H. Lunger, GM2 
George T. Ashcroft, GM1
George T. Ashcroft, GM1
Clark G. Buck, GM2
Clark G. Buck, GM2
Ernest C. Cauvin, MM1
Ernest C. Cauvin, MM1
Walter F. Covington, MM1
Walter F. Covington, MM1
Frederick Gilman, GM1
Frederick Gilman, GM1
Aliston H. Grindle, C Elect.
Aliston H. Grindle, C Elect.
Frank H. Herzog, ET2
Frank H. Herzog, ET2
Albert F. Jennie, ET2
Albert F. Jennie, ET2
Ivan L. Mahan, MM1
Ivan L. Mahan, MM1
Horace L. Moore, GM1
Horace L. Moore, GM1
William S. Nelson, MMC
William S. Nelson, MMC
Ensign Timothy A. Parker, XO
Ensign Timothy A. Parker, XO
Charles H. Wells, MM2
Charles H. Wells, MM2
Henry A. Withers, GM1
Henry A. Withers, GM1

Mixed crews of submariners on deck of F boat
This photo of submarine crews contains six men from the ill-fated USS F-4. The photo appears to have been taken on the deck of the F-1 since she shows an object on her deck like the one in front of George L. Deeth, EM1 second man from right. The weapons loading davit appears to be the same in shape and location as in other "F" class photos. There is another "F" class submarine in the photo just behind the men. Between Chief Colwell and the man in the old fashioned bathing suit can be seen part of a torpedo loading ramp. Behind the head of the second man from left, Archie H. Lunger, GM2, is the forward periscope fairing. The after periscope faring is behind the man on the far left. The bridge access trunk can be seen between the two periscopes. Photo taken prior to March 25, 1915.

~~~USS F-4 Salvage photos~~~
You will note that the USS F-4 was placed in dry dock in Honolulu Harbor.
At this time there was no Submarine Base at the Pearl Harbor Naval Station yet.
That was still 5 years off. She sank off the mouth of Honolulu Harbor not Pearl Harbor.

USS F-2 supplying air
USS F-2 supplies high pressure air to fill the pontoons to raise the F-4.
The men on the bow are handling a mooring line.
You can see it in the water in front of the bow of the F-2.


USS F-2 supplying air
USS F-2 supplies high pressure air to fill the pontoons to raise the F-4.
The men on the bow are handling a mooring line.


USS F-2 supplying air
USS F-2 supplies high pressure air to fill the pontoons to raise the F-4.
The men on the bow are handling a mooring line.


USS F-2 crew
USS F-2 crew on deck during the air supply opperation

USS F-2 commanding officer
USS F-2 commanding officer on the bridge while she supplies
high pressure air to fill the pontoons to raise the F-4.


USS F-2 crew on aft deck
USS F-2 crew on aft deck handling lines for mooring to the barge.
to supply high pressure air to fill the pontoons to raise the F-4.


On the salvage barge
Crew on the salvage barge manning the air manifold.
Most likely officers and consultants are under the awnings.
High pressure air supplied by the sistership USS F-2.


Salvage Team
Part of the salvage team on the barge to raise the F-4.
Men are most likely looking over the side to try and see what divers are doing.


Salvage Team
Part of the salvage team on the barge to raise the F-4.
Men are most likely looking over the side to try and see what divers are doing.


Salvage Team under Awning
Part of the salvage team on the barge to raise the F-4.
Men are resting or off duty relaxing under an awning.


First Pontoon up

First Pontoon up
Note on back of photo says:
"First pontoons up, Second pontoon showing.
Master Rigger Fred Busse who closed flood valves on first set of Pontoons"


Master Rigger Fred Busse
Master Rigger Fred Busse

Master Rigger Fred Busse
Master Rigger Fred Busse

Master Rigger Fred Busse on pontoon
Master Rigger Fred Busse on pontoon

Pontroons are up and the move to Pearl Harbor is about to get under way.
Pontroons are up and the move to Honolulu Harbor and a dry dock is about to get under way.
The tug is most likely the USS Navajo.


Pontroons are up and the move to Pearl Harbor is about to get under way.
Pontroons are up and the move to Honolulu Harbor and a dry dock is about to get under way.
The tug is most likely the USS Navajo.


One of the rigger walking on the pontoons.
One of the riggers walking on the pontoons checking fastening before the tow to Honolulu Harbor begins.

Salvage pontoons
USS F-4 salvage pontoons. The F-4 has been raised and is hanging from them.

Navy crew in row boat checking lines.
Navy crew in row boat checking lines

Pontoons with the F-4 hanging beneath them entering Pearl Harbor.
Pontoons with the F-4 hanging beneath them entering Honolulu Harbor.
Master Rigger Fred Busse is standing on the front of the left pontoon.


Pontoons with the F-4 hanging beneath them entering Pearl Harbor.
Pontoons with the F-4 hanging beneath them entering Honolulu Harbor.
Master Rigger Fred Busse is standing on the front of the left pontoon.


American Flag tied at half mast to an oar in honor of the 21 men who died aboard the F-4.
Pontoons with the F-4 hanging beneath them entering Honolulu Harbor.
American Flag tied at half mast to an oar in honor of the 21 men who died aboard the F-4.


Salvage Swimmers riding the pontoons into Pearl Harbor.
Pontoons with the F-4 hanging beneath them entering Honolulu Harbor.
Salvage swimmers riding the pontoons into Honolulu Harbor.


Salvage crew riding the pontoons into Pearl Harbor.
Pontoons with the F-4 hanging beneath them entering Honolulu Harbor.
Salvage crew riding the pontoons into Honolulu Harbor.


Salvage crew riding the pontoons into Pearl Harbor.
Pontoons with the F-4 hanging beneath them entering Honolulu Harbor.
Salvage crew riding the pontoons into Honolulu Harbor.


Observers watching the F-4 being brought into Pearl Harbor.
Observers watching the F-4 being brought into Honolulu Harbor.

Tying the pontoons up to the Quarantine Wharf in Pearl Harbor.	.
Tying the pontoons up to the Quarantine Wharf in Honolulu Harbor.
Flag tied to oar is at half mast for the 21 men who died.


Tying the pontoons up to the Quarantine Wharf in Pearl Harbor.
Tying the pontoons up to the Quarantine Wharf in Honolulu Harbor.
Notice the German Shepard dog aboard the pontoon.


Tying the pontoons up to the Quarantine Wharf in Pearl Harbor.
Pontoons are closer to the Quarantine Wharf in Honolulu Harbor.

F-4 in dry dock
F-4 in dry dock. Admiral Clifford J.Bousch is in white in the forground.
Hole in the portside of the forward compartment caused by battery acid weakening the hull is shown.


F-4 in dry dock
F-4 in dry dock. Showing damage to stern.
Hole in the portside of the forward compartment caused by battery acid weakening the hull is shown.


F-4 rudders and propellers
F-4 in dry dock. Showing damage to rudders and stern planes and propellers.

F-4 rudders and propellers
F-4 in dry dock. Showing damage to rudders and stern planes and propellers.
The stern planes and rudders have been torn away during the salvage effort.
The rams for the planes and rudders can be seen under the right hand propeller.
The skeg for holding the rudder is twisted almost 90 degrees to port.


F-4 port engine exhaust
F-4 port engine exhaust is shown. The super structure surrounding this has all been ripped away.

Damage caused by lifting chains during salvage effort.
Damage caused by lifting chains during salvage effort.

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A view inside the salvaged USS F-4 showing the forward battery August 31, 1915. The wood and canvas walking deck that covered these early batteries has fallen away or maybe had blown away due to a hydrogen explosion when the battery came in contact with salt water. The view is almost upside down since the F-4 is resting in the dry dock about 170 degrees from upright. (See dry dock photos)
The many plates of the battery are visible and even the small wooden wedges that held the plates an exact distance from each other can be seen. Due to the jostling of the salvage efforts many of the plates have fallen out of position.

Official US Navy Photo

USS F-4 in the Dry Dock. She is resting almost upside down
USS F-4 in the Dry Dock. She is resting almost upside down.
Note hole in port side of hull caused by implosion by water pressure.


Hole in hull is examined
Hole in hull is examined. The port bow plane can be seen in the foreground.

USS F-4 laying on her side in dry dock
USS F-4 laying on her side in dry dock
Photo courtesy of Mike Dilley; whose Father, Homer 'Pat' Dilley sailed aboard the USS F-2.

USS F-4 name
View of F-4's port side name plate, taken in dry dock at Honolulu, Hawaii, circa late August or early September 1915, after she had been raised from over 300 feet of water and towed into port.
These figures are mounted on the submarine's port bow, and are shown upside down, as she was dry-docked rolled to starboard approximately 120 degrees from the vertical.


The following artical is from the March 28th 1915 issue
of The New York Times

Copyright The New York Times

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Newspaper article describing the early search that went on for the F-4 and the recovery of a portion of one of her periscopes.



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This is believed to be a section of the periscope reported recovered in the above article during the early phases of the search for the F-4 off Honolulu Harbor on March 29, 1915. According to the tape measure it stands a little shy of 16 inches in height and is reported to be 4 inches in diameter. For some reason it has been made into a memorial cup. When or who did this is not known. Any research on this will be welcome by myself and Dr Newby, the owner of the object.

Photo taken by Dr Terrell Newby of the periscope section in his posession


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Close-up of the engraving on the on what is believed to be a section of the periscope reported recovered in the above article during the early phases of the search for the F-4 off Honolulu Harbor on March 29, 1915.

Photo taken by Dr Terrell Newby of the periscope section in his posession


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