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USS Plunger (A-1) SS 2

USS Plunger SS 2  later to be called A-1, was laid down May 21, 1901 at the Crescent Shipyard in Elizabeth, NJ. A contract was signed on August 22, 1900 for six boats instead of five and to be known as the ADDER class. The class was to include the Plunger SS 2  that preceded the ADDER SS 3  but to be known for the second boat of the class not the first. Plunger was launched February 2, 1902.  She was commissioned 18 months later on September 9, 1903. 

President Theodore Roosevelt became the first American President to descend in a Submarine in Plunger August 25, 1905 in Oyster Bay, Long Island, NY. Plunger was decommissioned November 3, 1905 and then re-commissioned February 23, 1907 and served on active duty through WW I.  She was decommissioned for the last time December 12, 1919. Struck from the Navy List on February 24, 1920 and sold as "deck cargo" along with the vessel Puritan  0n January 26, 1922.


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Page From 1906 edition of Navy Today in the Private Collection of Ric Hedman
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Close-up of crew and civilian standin on the deck of the dry docked Plunger circa 1906.

"Thanks, Teddy! The Origin of Submarine Pay"
(From the Sacramento Chapter Periscope)

Should Teddy Roosevelt be the patron saint of submariners? Roosevelt was the first American President to go aboard a submarine and to make a dive. Roosevelt ventured beneath the waters of Long Island Sound aboard USS Plunger (SS 2) on March 25, 1905. Plunger was the United States' second submarine, commissioned in September 1903.

Beyond this historical first, however, is the fact that Roosevelt was the man directly responsible for submarine pay. The Naval hierarchy in 1905 considered submarine duty, neither unusual nor dangerous, and classified it as shore duty. Therefore, submariners received twenty-five percent less pay than sailors going to sea in Destroyers, Cruisers and similar surface ships.

Roosevelt's two-hour trip on Plunger convinced him that this discrimination was unfair. He described submarine duty as hazardous and difficult, and he found that submariners "have to be trained to the highest possible point as well as to show iron nerve in order to be of any use in their positions…"

Roosevelt directed that officer service on submarines be equated with duty on surface ships. Enlisted men qualified in submarines were to receive ten dollars per month in addition to the pay of their rating. They were also to be paid a dollar for every day in which they were submerged while underway. Enlisted men assigned to submarines but not yet qualified received an additional five dollars per month.

Roosevelt did not dilly-dally once he made a decision. He issued an Executive Order directing the extra pay for enlisted personnel. This was the beginning of submarine pay!

Thanks to Larrys Home Port: http://larryshomeport.com/html/subpay.html

Page From 1906 edition of Navy Today in the Private Collection of Ric Hedman
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USS Plunger (A-1) SS 2 & USS Shark (A-7) SS 8


USS Adder (A-2) SS 3
The USS Adder (A-2) SS 3 is shown here (middle) with USS Moccasin (A-4) SS 5in background and in the foreground quite possibly the USS Plunger (A-1) SS 2 or Fulton, a prototype submarine built to test systems planned for use in new ADDER class, both had the free standing deck supports shown here.  Adder was laid down October 3, 1900 and she was launched July 22, 1901. Adder  was commissioned January 12, 1903. Decommissioned July 26, 1909 and subsequently recommissioned February 10, 1910 until decommissioning again on December 12, 1919. Adder was struck from the Navy List on January 16, 1922 and was sunk as a target in Manila bay near Corregidor January 26, 1922.

Crew muster

USS Adder, Submarine No 3, later renamed A-2 attached to submarine April 15, 1910

Howell, James B. - Ensign - age 24 - Born; Wyoming
Callan, James - GM 1/C - age 27 - Born; District of Columbia
Chrisholm, Archibald - Chief Electrician - age 22 - Born; Virginia
Coleman, Newton H. - Electrician 2/C - age 25 - Born; Tennessee
Chittenden, John W. - MM 2/C - age 24 - Born; New York
Harragan, Stephen M. - Chief MM - age 29 - Born; Alabama
Lindley, Frederick M. - MM 2/C - age 26 - Born; Indiana
Landis, Thomas E. - Electrician 1/C - age 25 - Born; North Carolina
Mathis, Edward P. - Electrician 1/C - age 26 - Born; Iowa
Prather, Henry L. - Chief Gunners Mate - age 27 - Born; Missouri
Rodane, John J. - GM 1/C - age 30 - Born; Pennsylvania
Schultz, Charles H. - MM 1/C - age 24 - Born; Texas

Thank you to Linda Talbott of the US GenWeb Census Project ® for providing this information.

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The USS Adder under tow most likely on Long Island Sound en-route to New Suffolk on Great Peconic Bay where Electic Boat Corporation had its first offices. Adder was built at the Crescent Shipyard owned by Lewis Nixon, who was a subcontractor for John Holland. The tow cable can be see on the right side of the photo. The three men on deck are Electric Boat employees. The man in the center has the topside helm or steering wheel in his hands and is no doubt keeping the submarine steady on a course and stopping it from tracking back and forth as it is being towed.

Library Of Congress Photo
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The three men on deck are Electric Boat employees. The man in the center has the topside helm or steering wheel in his hands and is no doubt keeping the submarine steady on an even course with the tow boat and stopping it from tracking back and forth as it is being towed. The thin pole that extends up the back of the mast and shows as being taller than the mast itself in the photo above is, in fact, a boat hook.

Up until about the First World War shipbuilders conducted all the trials for vessels until they were certified as acceptable by the Navy. Other than a small naval precence the yards did all the testing.

Library Of Congress Photo
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The USS A-2 off Cavite, Manila Harbor, Philippines. The whole crew is on deck for this photo and looking remarkably tidy compared to many photo from this time frame. The crews had little or no hygiene facilities and oil and grease was almost everywhere. This photo was taken some time after she was renamed on November 17, 1911, becoming simply A-2 (Submarine Torpedo Boat No. 3). This photo is probably circa 1912.

The A-2 has had the bow modification of a superstructure fairing slipped over her existing hull configuration. This kept the sub and crews on deck drier in a seaway.

Original Photo in the Private Collection of Ric Hedman
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Detail from the above photo. The A-2 has had the bow modification of a superstructure fairing slipped over her existing hull configuration. This kept the sub and crews on deck drier in a seaway.

Original Photo in the Private Collection of Ric Hedman
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Detail from larger photo above. The USS A-2 off Cavite, Manila Harbor, Philippines. The whole crew is on deck for this photo and looking remarkably tidy compared to many photo from this time frame. The crews had little or no hygiene facilities and oil and grease was almost everywhere.

Original Photo in the Private Collection of Ric Hedman
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USS Adder is loading a Mark 7 (D) torpedo while on Manila Station. The torpedo is loaded tail first since there wasn't enough room in the hull the slide the "fish" in nose first. These early submarines were one huge compartment inside. A good detail of the torpedo loading hatch and its locking arrangement and gasket seal.

US Navy Photo
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Another view of the scene above as USS Adder is loading a Mark 7 (D) torpedo while on Manila Station. Notice the trolley in the right foreground that brought this torpedo to the pier side. A crane on the dock has hoisted the torpedo from the pier to the submarine for loading.

US Navy Photo
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3 A boats in dry dock, Cavite, Philippines
3 A boats in dry dock, Cavite, Philippines. Date unknown

Torpedoes at Cavite Base, Philippine Islands, 1906
Torpedoes at Cavite Base, Philippine Islands, 1906

Crew muster

USS Grampus, Submarine No 4, later renamed A-3 attached to submarine April 15, 1910
Data base is incomplete due to lost records.

Olding James P. - Ensign age 26 - Born; Nevada
Johnstone Harold H. - Midshipman age 23 - Born; Montana
Noren Charles E. - C. G. M. age 35 - Born; Sweden
Alden Henry C. - C. Elec. age 30 - Born; Ohio
Jordan Clyde W. - C. M. M. age 31 - Born; Indiana
White Robert J. - G. M. 1C age 28 - Born; New York
Wroughton Edwin R. - Q. M. 1C age 24 - Born; Nebraska
Saar Frank A. - MM 1/C age 29 - Born; Michigan
Moril Paul M. - MM 1/C age 25 - Born; Pennsylvania
Crofeet William - Elec 1/C age 25 - Born; New York
Cooke John B. - Elec 1/C age 25 - Born; Arkansas
Kuhnen Alexander G. - MM 2/C age 25 - Born; Texas

Thank you to Linda Talbott of the US GenWeb Census Project ® for providing this information.

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The USS Pike, (left) and USS Grampus, (right), nested together. Location is uncertain but most likely San Francisco area. circa 1905. Four crew can be seen on the deck of the Pike working on something that can't be decerned. Note the magnetic compass binnacles mounted aft of the permanently mounted periscopes. The compasses were mounted outside the hulls because the steel in the hulls interfered with the compass. They were viewed with mirrors. The periscopes are held in position with guy-wires and did not rotate. The torpedo loading hatches are open on the bows.

Original Photo From the Private Collection of Ric Hedman
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USS Grampus on seatrials off the California coast.
USS Grampus on seatrials off the California coast.
USS Grampus on seatrials off the California coast.
USS Grampus on seatrials off the California coast.
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The second man standing from the right, with further investigation of the photo, has been identified as Albert Dathe. If this photo was taken after the acceptance trials some of the the seven men on deck could be Captain Frank Cable, William F. C. Nindemann, Harry H. Morrell, Henery S. Lathrop, Herman W. Noblett and Lawrence Spear and Gunner Owen Hill, U. S. Navy. All experienced submariners. These men performed the "shakedown" for both boats before the Naval Board and the trials were satisfactory to everyone.  (The names do not correspond to the order the men are standing in.) That would also explain why there is no crew standing on the deck of the Pike.

Interesting to note the two electrical wires lead through the after ventilator. If you follow the wires they drape into the water from the dock and up to the ventilator. A very unsafe action especially in this early days of electrical technology. This appears to be an early form of shore power being applied to the submarine for in port use.

At the extreme left of the photo in the background can be seen one of the San Francisco Bay ferries. Not enough detail can be seen to identify it.

An interesting tidbit is that the first commanding officer of Grampus was Lt. Arthur MacArthur, jr, (the older brother of later to be General of the Army Douglas MacArthur of WW II fame), who also was, at the same time, the first Captain of the USS Pike (A-5) SS 6.

An original NON-Navy photo in the Private Collection of Ric Hedman.


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The second man standing from the right, with further investigation of the photo, has been identified as Albert Dathe. If this photo was taken after the acceptance trials some of the the seven men on deck could be Captain Frank Cable, William F. C. Nindemann, Harry H. Morrell, Henery S. Lathrop, Herman W. Noblett and Lawrence Spear and Gunner Owen Hill, U. S. Navy. All experienced submariners. These men performed the "shakedown" for both boats before the Naval Board and the trials were satisfactory to everyone.  (The names do not correspond to the order the men are standing in.) That would also explain why there is no crew standing on the deck of the Pike. 

An interesting tidbit is that the first commanding officer of Grampus was Lt. Arthur MacArthur, jr, (the older brother of later to be General of the Army Douglas MacArthur of WW II fame), who also was, at the same time, the first Captain of the USS Pike (A-5) SS 6.

An original NON-Navy photo in the Private Collection of Ric Hedman.


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USS Pike (A-5) SS 6 moored behind the USS Grampus and in front of an unidentified navy ship at San Francisco. Her rectangular torpedo loading hatch is open for ventilation. The after ventilator for the Grampus can be seen in the left foreground of the image with two electrical wires leading through it. We can only assume that the Pike has a similar arrangement.

An original NON-Navy photo in the Private Collection of Ric Hedman.


At the extreme left of the photo in the background can be seen one of the San Francisco Bay ferries. Not enough detail can be seen to identify it.

An original NON-Navy photo in the Private Collection of Ric Hedman.

USS Garmpus & USS Pike in San Diego, Calif.
USS Grampus & USS Pike in San Diego, Calif.
SS Moccasin (A-4) SS 5.

In the background is Plunger, Hollands' steam powered hull #V later abandoned.

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The interior of the USS Moccasin (A-4) showing her torpedo tube and two reload torpedoes. The photo was taken at Manila, Philippine Islands, circa 1912. What look to be torpedoes outboard on each side are actually air flasks. The torpedoes are resting on wood "skids", called that because they were "skidded" on the thwart ship rails seen running from side to side in the photo, to align it with the tube for loading the torpedo.

The torpedoes shown here are the Bliss-Levitt MK 7 (D) Mod 5 torpedo. They were 12 feet long and 17.7 inched wide to fit into the tubes of the A class submarines. They carried a warhead with 326 pounds of TPX and had a range of 2000 yards.

An interesting tidbit is the fan mounted above and to the right of the torpedo tube. Use to provide the crew with some air circulation and cooling. It also prevented the accumulation of hydrogen gas to pocket in one place as the battery out-gassed.

The interior of the A class was one large space with no bulkheads. Where this photo was taken from is approximately the center of the submarine. Below the deck seen in this photo is the ships storage battery used for electrical power for lighting and propulsion while submerged. The battery is covered by wood planks and then has a canvas covering that is stretched tight and then shellacked in place or may be painted to make it water tight.

US Navy Photo
Thanks to Jim Christley for the torpedo information.
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Crew muster

USS Moccasin, Submarine No 5, later renamed A-4 attached to submarine April 15, 1910
Data base is incomplete due to lost records.

Mc Who*ler Ernest D. - Ensign - age 26 - Born: Mississippi
Aber Edward - Machinists Mate 1st Class - age 27 - Born: New Jersey
Dix Louis A. - Electrician 1st Class - age 23 - Born: Wisconsin
Featherstone James A. - Ch. Electrician - age 28 - Born: Pennsylvania
Leahey, Daniel - Chief GM - age 28 - Born: New York
Littlefield, Roy C. - Chief MM - age 27 - Born: Massachusetts
Mason, Frank L. - Electrician 2/C - age 23 - Born: Massachusetts
Purtell, George E. - GM 1/C - age 26 - Born: Massachusetts
Porter, James - GM 1/C age 29 - Born: - Virginia - Negro
Riley, John - MM 2/C age 23 - Born: - West Virginia
Woodward, Harry C. - Electrician 2/C - age 22 - Born: New York
Wolfington, James H. - GM 1/C - age 26 - Born: Illinois

Thank you to Linda Talbott of the US GenWeb Census Project ® for providing this information.
* = unknown letter

Moccasin was launched at the Crescent Shipyard in Elizabethport, N.J. on August 20, 1901 and commissioned on January 17, 1903 at the Holland yard at New Suffolk, N.Y. She operated out of the Naval Torpedo Station in Newport, RI. In July of 1909 she and her sister ship Adder were loaded as deck cargo on a ship and sent to Manila Bay, Philippines. She and other submarines of her class patrolled the entrance of Manila Bay during WW I as part of the First Submarine Division, Asiatic Torpedo Fleet. Moccasin was decommissioned on December 12, 1919 and struck from the Navy list January 16, 1922. She was sunk as a target January 26, 1922 near Corregidor.

USS Pike (A-5) SS 6

USS Pike (A-5) SS 6 Stern View

Pike's hull was laid down on December 10, 1900 in San Francisco, California, by Union Iron Works. Pike was launched on 14 January 1903 and commissioned at the Mare Island Navy Yard, Lt. Arthur MacArthur, Jr. (the older brother of General Douglas MacArthur) was in command. Lt MacArthur had been the first Commanding Officer of the USS Grampus (A-3) SS 4 as well. Pike operated from Mare Island Navy Yard for three years in training roles. Members of Pike's crew took part in the relief efforts after the earthquake in San Francisco on April 18, 1906. Pike was decommissioned on November 28, 1906 and remained in inactive status until June of 1908, when she was recommissioned for operations with the Pacific Torpedo Flotilla, on the Pacific coast. Pike was renamed A-5 (Submarine Torpedo Boat No. 6) on 17 November 1911. Pike (A-5) was sent to the Puget Sound Navy Yard on June 26, 1912 and placed in reserve. Two and a half years later, Pike (A-5) was loaded on board the ship Hector and on February 15, 1915 she and her sister ship Grampus (A-3) sailed for the the Philippines as deck cargo. She was recommissioned on April 17, 1912 and assigned to the Asiatic Fleet.
Soon after the beginning of World War I, Pike sank at the dock at the Cavite Navy Yard, on April 15, 1917. The sinking was due to a leak in a main ballast tank. She was raised on April 19 and, reconditioned and sent back to active service patrolling the waters to Manila Bay.
Pike was decommissioned on July 25, 1921. She was struck from the Navy list January 16, 1922 and later sank as a target off Corregidor.

USS Pike, USS A-5
USS Pike, USS A-5 in Carquinez Strait, California, about 1906.
She is just in the act of surfacing.

USS Pike (A-5) at Mare Island Naval Ship Yard
USS Pike (A-5) at Mare Island Naval Ship Yard

Crew muster

U.S.S. Pike Plunger class submarine (SS-6), renamed A-5 in November, 1911.
Data base is incomplete due to lost records.

Donovan Kirkwood H. - Midshipman - age 23 Born Ohio
Ryan Raymond - C.G.M. - age 25 Born Ireland
Essig William H. - C. Elec. - age 25 Born New York
Schroeder, Gust - GM 1/C - age 27 Born; Wisconsin
Ertel, Edward G. - MM 1/C - age 29 Born; Germany
Bucom, Roy E. - Elec. 1/C - age 24 Born; Missouri
Myrick, Lester B. - Elec. 1/C - age 24 Born; Maine
Ethrington, William J. - MM 1/C age 34 - Born; Michigan
Kautcke, Wendel - MM 1/C age 33 - Born; Indiana
Murphy, Robert W. - GM 2/C age 32 - Born; Connecticut
Ward, Charles A. - MM 2/C age 34 - Born; New York

Thank you to Linda Talbott of the US GenWeb Census Project ® for providing this information.

Grampus or Pike on the Willipa River, Washington State
Grampus or Pike on the Willapa River, at Raymond, Washington, circa 1912. The A class subs were fitted with a bow fairing to improve sea keeping, this can be seen by the dark shadow area forward of the conning tower. Both submarines were placed in reserve in 1912 at Bremerton. This photo was probably taken on the trip up the coast to Bremerton. The stern of the USS Chattanooga can be seen in front of the sub.
Photo provided by Steve Hubbard of the Pacific County Historical Society , Washington State

The USS Pike SS 6 Crew in 1911. Location unknown.


The USS Pike SS 6 Crew in 1911. Location unknown.
Two Officers and two crew on bridge.
One of the officers is probably Commanding Officer, Midshipman Kirkwood H. Donovan.


The USS Pike SS 6 Crew in 1911. Location unknown.
Three Chief Petty Officers posing for the camera. At least one looked happy about it.


The USS Pike SS 6 Crew in 1911. Location unknown.
Two Petty Officers of the USS Pike posing for the camera.


USS Porpoise (A-6) SS 7
The USS Porpoise hull was laid down on December 13, 1900 at the Crescent Shipyard in Elizabethport, N.J. She was launched September 23, 1901. After launching she was towed to the Goldsmith & Tuthuill Yard in New Suffolk for completion and trials. Porpoisewas commissioned September 19, 1903. the USS Porpoise (A-6) SS 7 was decommissioned on April 21, 1908 and sent with her sister submarine, the USS Shark (A-7) SS 8 to the Cavite Navy Yard, The Philippines. USS Porpoise was re-commissioned in November 1908 there.
USS Porpoise served the rest of her active duty operating out of Cavite. She patrolled the entrance to Manila bay during WW I.  She was decommissioned for the last time December 12, 1919 and struck from the Navy List January 16, 1922. She was later sank as a target off Corregidor.

Crew muster

USS Porpoise, Submarine No 7, later renamed A-6 attached to submarine April 15, 1910
Data base is incomplete due to lost records.

Vande Parr James P. - Ensign - age 24 - Born; New York
Brown Harley H. - Machinists Mate 1st class - - age 27 - Born; Vermont
Dergrinan William - Electrician 1st class - - age 31 - Born; Missouri
Gratner John L. - Machinists Mate 2nd class - - age 23 - Born; Texas
Hodson, Emil - Seaman - age 25 - Born; Montana
Irwin, Max A. Electrician 2/C - age 23 - Born; Missouri
Kimbel, Andrew J. - Electrician 2/C - age 25 - Born; Indiana
Mc Farland, Otis H. - Chief GM - age 26 - Born; Indiana
Stack, James F. - GM 2/C - age 23 - Born; Massachusetts
Storey, Norman H. - Chief Electrician - age 34 - Born; Maryland
Van Sickle, William E. - Chief MM - age 31 - Born; Missouri

Thank you to Linda Talbott of the US GenWeb Census Project ® for providing this information.

USS Shark (A-7) SS 8
USS Shark (A-7) SS 8 had her hull laid down on January 11, 1901 at Lewis Nixon's Crescent Shipyard in Elizabethport, N.J. Shark was launched October 19, 1901. After completion and trials Shark was commissioned on September 19, 1903. She operated out of Newport for her first three years of active duty. In March 1907 USS Shark (A-7) SS 8 was assigned to the 1st Submarine Flotilla stationed at the Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland.
Shark was decommissioned in 1908 and sent with her sister submarine, the USS Porpoise (A-6) SS 7 to the Cavite Navy Yard, The Philippines. USS Shark was re-commissioned in August 14, 1908.
USS Shark served the rest of her active duty operating out of Cavite. She patrolled the entrance to Manila bay during WW I.
On July 24, 1917, gasoline fumes ignited and caused an explosion and fire while on patrol in Manila Bay. The engine of the submarine been overhauled a short time before. The crew battled the fire until the Captain ordered the men topside and into boats. Six men later died from the effects of the fire. Ltjg. Arnold Marcus, the submarines commanding officer, died the next day, 25 July 1917, he refused treatment until all of his men had been treated. Shark was never returned to patrol duty, the effects of the fire being so great.
She was decommissioned for the last time December 12, 1919 and struck from the Navy List January 16, 1922. She was later sank as a target off Corregidor.

Crew Lost Aboard the USS A-7 - 24/July/1918

Currie J.M. EMC Gasoline Explosion
Hixon I.P. MM2 Gasoline Explosion
Hopewell Otho GM2 Gasoline Explosion
Kunz J.A. MM1 Gasoline Explosion
Lang Harold H. MM1 Gasoline Explosion
Marcus Arnold Ltjg Gasoline Explosion

Crew muster

USS Shark, Submarine No 8, later renamed A-7 attached to submarine April 15, 1910

Jensen, Henry M. - Ensign - age 26 - Born; Minnesota
Beaudford, Thomas S. - Electrician 2/C - age 30 - Born; Maryland
Dowd, John J. - Chief Electrician age 29 - Born; New Jersey
Draper, Harry - Chief MM - age 33 - Born; New York
Greensmith, Joe - Chief GM - age 38 - Born; England
Grimes, Chester J. - GM 2/C - age 25 - Born; Idaho
Harris, William E. - Chief GM - age 29 - Born; Virginia - Mulatto
Hershey, Orville S. - MM 2/C - age 25 - Born; Maryland
Heslar, Fred O. - Electrician 1/C - age 22 - Born; Indiana
Miller, Thomas M. - Electrician 2/C - age 23 - Born; Indiana
Mc Gains, Joseph E. - GM 1/C - age 24 - Born; Arizona
Sicer, Leonard - MM 1/C - age 24 - Born; Pennsylvania
Streiff ,Robert J. - MM 2/C - age 22 - Born; Minnesota

Thank you to Linda Talbott of the US GenWeb Census Project ® for providing this information.

A-boat in frame
A-boat in frame. It is unclear at this point which end of the boat is shown here.
Milne Special Collections, University of New Hampshire Library, Durham, N.H.

Interior of an A-Boat during construction
Interior of an A-Boat during construction at Lewis Nixons'
Cresent Shipyard in Elizabethport, NJ.
Workman sitting gives a good sense of scale to the interior of an A-boat.
Milne Special Collections, University of New Hampshire Library, Durham, N.H.

A-boat looking foreward during building process
A-boat looking forward during building process.
Sign on Torpedo Tube Door says: "Hands Off"
Milne Special Collections, University of New Hampshire Library, Durham, N.H.

A-boat looking aft, battery instalation
A-boat looking aft, battery installation in progress.
The fly wheel for the gas engine can be seen just aft of the battery.
Milne Special Collections, University of New Hampshire Library, Durham, N.H.

A-boat battery installation in process.
A-boat battery installation in process. The pegs are for spacing the battery plates.
Milne Special Collections, University of New Hampshire Library, Durham, N.H.

A Boat torpedo room
A typical A Boat torpedo room. Outer and inner doors are open.
Note wooden planking over the top of the batteries.
Unknown A-Boat from the stern
Aa unknown A-Boat viewed from the stern.
Most likely it is the CO (top right) Chief (top left).
The crewman is seated on the Allied Bell, an underwater signaling device.


Unknown A-Boat crewman seated at  the stern
The crewman is seated on the Allied Bell, an underwater signaling device.
He also appears to have a letter from home in his pocket.


Captain and Chief on the 'bridge'
Captain at the right and a Chief on the left.
They are standing on the raised "bridge deck" used to keep the crew dry while on the surface.


Length 63' 9"
Beam 11' 8"
Disp. Sur. 107 tons
Disp. Sub. 123 tons
Test Depth 150'
Crew 7
Armament 5 Torpedoes
1 18" Torp Tube

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